ASUS firmware will change the verification method

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L&LD

Part of the Furniture
I think the 378.54_1 for the AC68 be the last firmware for me. As is my risk simply too big.

I think your risk gets bigger over time by staying with that old firmware, actually.
 

mstombs

Very Senior Member
So will Asus field upgrade all users CFEs to block or add validation to tftp and CFE web interface method to update firmware, which I assume is also used by Asus recovery tools? I doubt it - but presumably new routers for US market will have to have more restrictive CFEs.

Big thanks to Asus for continuing to support OpenSource community despite the obstacles being thrown in their path. It will be interesting to see if TP-Link for example just try to use the FCC rulings to avoid their obligations to release GPL sourc-code - I doubt they are going to buy closed source VxWorks etc foir their routers!
 

rtcomputersinc

Senior Member
That's a gigantic huge can of suck. I understand the why but my aircard on my two 66u's has not worked on the past 2 firmware releases. This has left me staying downgraded since December 2015 as I only use these as spot routers with aircard for internet access. If i load the new non-downgrade fw and my aircard doesn't work I am left with 2 paperweights. I cant wait another 6 months while asus gets their act together. Its just going to force many to not update. What a mess.
 

rtcomputersinc

Senior Member
Additionally I had an 87u at a customer site that the internet wouldnt connect on after updating to fw 378.9460. If I downgraded it worked and if upgraded it would not. Im going to have to have to have spares of the different routers incase the no internet issue rears its head with your new fw. If the new fw works flawless great no problem BUT if it doesn't I have a HUGE problem. Lets face it how often has there been a really great fw come out. You may want to see if they will allow you to roll back at least a couple of older firmwares versions to make the transition a little easier. Then finally kill the ability to use the older ones after the new fw is pretty stable.
 

punkinduster

Regular Contributor
I kind of look at it this way. If you have features or requirements that are so important then you really shouldn't be running alpha and beta and the latest and greatest versions of firmware. Let someone else test it until it is very well baked before upgrading. This issue of not being able to backup to an earlier version is only a one time and done deal when they make the initial change. So wait until you KNOW the feature you require works before you update to the new firmware! Sounds kinda easy to me. Now I'm off to worry about something else that might actually be important... ;)
 

voyager62

New Around Here
The question is whether or not this will result in firmware that only allows FCC permitted (=USA) settings. Since Europa is much more liberal when it comes to channels use, would European users thus be limited ?
Actually, IMHO you should be more worried that ASUS will only support EU firmware once the EU's new and more restrictive than the FCC regulations are implemented.

http://arstechnica.co.uk/tech-policy/2016/04/eu-radio-equipment-directive-fsfe-opensource-iot/

edit: added quote
 

Chrysalis

Senior Member
The problem I have is the lazy implementation in europe.

Locked down wifi devices only use a tiny fraction of the legal 5ghz spectrum which is actually smaller than the 2.4ghz range.

I am also convinced some EU lock downs are buggy with unstable wireless dropping out etc.

So yes I will be sticking with john's fork as long as is viable and my ac68. I am still limited to the restricted 5ghz range because some devices I use are locked down client side, but john's fork at least has stable signal strength without drop outs.

There has been a sledge hammer approach to this, they could e.g. have made the routers dectect conflicting radar signals and then in those situations block the frequencies, but in places like urban area's where is no large radar's then allow it. Instead there is just a blanket block. Not to mention no one has really provided proof of things like airplanes crashing etc. due to home router's apparently wiping out airport signals.

Also as far as I can tell USA rules are more leniant, in devices that allow it, selecting usa as region offers by far the most channels.
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture

vaszago

Regular Contributor
I wouldn't worry too much about some regions getting updates and others not - this is easy to manage in a single build...

Asus should put a proper location request. So they know where the router is located. And then release the allowable frequencies for the various countries.

Just as it makes google. The know well where my router is located.
 

voyager62

New Around Here
Asus should put a proper location request. So they know where the router is located. And then release the allowable frequencies for the various countries.

That sounds a lot like how 802.11d worked and the FCC banned it. It was too easy to spoof the check.
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
That sounds a lot like how 802.11d worked and the FCC banned it. It was too easy to spoof the check.

And I remember at least one person who was having issues because his neighbour's router was broadcasting the wrong region.
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
And I remember at least one person who was having issues because his neighbour's router was broadcasting the wrong region.

Yep, I posted a link a while back about that one - neighbor had regulatory zone set to TW, and it caused his laptop client to skip channels in his regulatory domain
 

vaszago

Regular Contributor
Yep, I posted a link a while back about that one - neighbor had regulatory zone set to TW, and it caused his laptop client to skip channels in his regulatory domain

The firmware must decide which region is located. The user does not have access to change it.
Must be in closed surce.

If the router can not locate the place he work by the rouls from FCC.
 

vaszago

Regular Contributor
It was too easy to spoof the check.

This must prevent asus. But who wants to keep his place secret. That would be a minority.
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
That sounds a lot like how 802.11d worked and the FCC banned it. It was too easy to spoof the check.

The 802.11d is a completely different topic than the FCC Rule and Order related to this topic...

Backstory on the 11d issue is more focused on handsets and MiFi type devices as they are extremely mobile in the global context, and the Reg Domain was typically focused on the home country/region...
 

vaszago

Regular Contributor
I wonder how ASUS still didn't fixed it, the exact same scanerio with RT-AC66U...

I think ASUS dont know that the Repeater Mode is broken.
 

vaszago

Regular Contributor
then report it via the feedback page in the gui

In my currently used firmware there is no field for Confirming errors. Is there a page for confirming erros in the current firmware when the router in Repeter mode.
 

punkinduster

Regular Contributor
Couldn't they add basic GPS technology to the router at an extremely low cost so the firmware would know what region info to use?
 

fax

Senior Member
GPS signal does not reach indoor environments. Or am I missing something? o_O
 
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