1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
Dismiss Notice

Welcome To SNBForums

SNBForums is a community for anyone who wants to learn about or discuss the latest in wireless routers, network storage and the ins and outs of building and maintaining a small network.

If you'd like to post a question, simply register and have at it!

While you're at it, please check out SmallNetBuilder for product reviews and our famous Router Charts, Ranker and plenty more!

Comtrend PG-9172 G.hn Powerline Adapter Reviewed

Discussion in 'LAN & WAN Article Discussions' started by Scott Willy, Jul 2, 2015.

  1. Scott Willy

    Scott Willy New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    "G.hn occupies a band from 300 MHz to 2.6 GHz,"
    The above is false.

    On powerline G.hn uses 2-50 MHz or 2-80 MHz bands. The Marvell chip in MIMO mode uses 2-50 MHz band in SISO mode uses 2-80 MHz.
     
  2. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    13,959
  3. Scott Willy

    Scott Willy New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2015
    Messages:
    6
  4. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    13,959
    I sorted this out with Comtrend and corrected the article. Thanks again for pointing out the error.
     
  5. Chuck Petras

    Chuck Petras New Around Here

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    So my takeaway from the article is that I can use the two different technologies (G.hn, AV/AV2) to create two independent bridges?

    How does it handle two-phase wiring? For instance there is a transformer on my power poll that brings down two 120V feeds. I imagine these are distributed to different circuits in my master circuit breaker panel.

    Background for my question is that my broadband router is located in an upstairs bedroom next to where my wide area wifi comes into the house. Eventually the telco offered dsl (I'm like 19,000 ft from the co), so I used the existing telco copper to locate the dsl next to the router. Unfortunately the house copper sucks (lots of noise). I've been using an Actiontech pwr500 to bridge to a backroom where I've got the printer and some other stuff.

    If I move the dsl modem to where the telco line comes into the house it locks great. So I'd like to use another power line bridge to get the ethernet out of the dsl modem back to the router.
     
  6. Scott Willy

    Scott Willy New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    You can, but there is not really many reasons to do so. The sharing of the bandwidth is smarter if you use the same technologies. You can have two independent (logical ) bridges (aka LANs) using the same technologies.

    The signals from either technology will cross phases in the circuit breaker. The is a small loss of performance, but it generally works. But remember when using and powerline communications product, buy from a store with a good returns policy in case it does not work.