How to secure my router/modem vertically to the wall

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Johno

Regular Contributor
I need to place my FTTC modem on the wall next to the broadband service faceplate in a cupboard but want to avoid drilling holes or sticking anything permanent to the wall as there are cables and pipes behind the plaster.

The 3M command hooks seem ideal as they're easy to remove, but has anyone use them or something similar (and easily removable) for hanging/mounting routers and modems on the wall? My modem has screw slots underneath for vertical mounting.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
I use 3M command strips and hooks for hanging pictures, some of them very large and heavy. They work really well provided you've got a good surface for them to stick to. To be safe use hooks that are rated for a much heavier load than you ever expect to allow for "tugging" on cables. I'd guess that there might be an issue with the glue "melting" over time if you're putting them in a hot environment or if the modem itself gets hot.
 

follower

Senior Member
I need to place my FTTC modem on the wall next to the broadband service faceplate in a cupboard but want to avoid drilling holes or sticking anything permanent to the wall as there are cables and pipes behind the plaster.

The 3M command hooks seem ideal as they're easy to remove, but has anyone use them or something similar (and easily removable) for hanging/mounting routers and modems on the wall? My modem has screw slots underneath for vertical mounting.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07SSXJ18Q/?tag=snbforums-20
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
Is there a mounting base plate available ?

Otherwise, i would mount a small shelf on the wall and set the modem on it to avoid heat issues. Otherwise a small table or shelf rack sitting on the floor.
 

Johno

Regular Contributor
Is there a mounting base plate available ?

Otherwise, i would mount a small shelf on the wall and set the modem on it to avoid heat issues. Otherwise a small table or shelf rack sitting on the floor.
No base plate, just the screw slots underneath to allow hanging/mounting using suitably-sized dome-headed screws. Unfortunately, there's not enough room to mount any size of shelf, it's a coat cupboard hence the need to wall-hang the modem vertically.
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
is the wall covered with actual plaster on mesh/lathe or is it gypsum board ?

what does the modem weigh ?

Maybe this would work - get a nice looking board the right width and long enough to raise the modem to the height you want. Mount the screws near one end on the wide flat side. set the board vertically leaning against the wall. Hang the modem on the screws.
 
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Johno

Regular Contributor
is the wall covered with actual plaster on mesh/lathe or is it gypsum board ?

what does the modem weigh ?

Maybe this would work - get a nice looking board the right width and long enough to raise the modem to the height you want. Mount the screws near one end on the wide flat side. set the board vertically leaning against the wall. Hang the modem on the screws.
That's a very simple and effective solution - thank you. I did think of that myself but your suggestion makes me think that that's the best solution. I could put a few small rubber feet on the base of the board to prevent it slipping.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Don't take chances with your internet, be sure you do it right and do it once. :)

 

Clark Griswald

Senior Member
Wire Corner Shelving

Perhaps this could work for you, since it can sustain the weight, space for wires, and ventilation.
This solution does not require a welder ;)
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
But just as bad as my welder photo, the metal in the solution may hamper optimum Wi-Fi reach/throughput.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
But just as bad as my welder photo, the metal in the solution may hamper optimum Wi-Fi reach/throughput.
It's for a modem not a wireless router (assuming he's using the correct terminology).
 

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