Release RT-AC86U 11th January 2021 Firmware version 3.0.0.4.386.41634

  • ATTENTION! As of November 1, 2020, you are not able to reply to threads 6 months after the thread is opened if there are more than 500 posts in the thread.
    Threads will not be locked, so posts may still be edited by their authors.
    Just start a new thread on the topic to post if you get an error message when trying to reply to a thread.

jozsiszfvar

New Around Here
Yes. But you will need a USB drive of some sort inserted to trigger the process. (There may be another way, too)

Enable SSH access LAN only.
In a terminal (Putty is great for this) log into your router
You will use the VI editor to create a file and enter contents

vi /jffs/post-mount (Enter)

Enter insert mode by pressing i then Enter

#!/bin/sh
pwr config --wait on

Then type :wq to save and exit VI

Set permissions in the file

chmod 755 /jffs/post-mount

Next enter the NVRAM edit

nvram set script_usbmount="/jffs/post-mount"

nvram commit

That's it. When you insert a USB drive the post-mount script will run. This was originally intended to mount a swap file which may be a good idea if you use Samba.

To make a swap file on a thumb drive

Run these commands to make a 512 MB swap file on the USB drive labeled 32GB (Use the label of your thumb drive)

dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/mnt/32GB/myswap.swp bs=1k count=524288

mkswap /tmp/mnt/32GB/myswap.swp

swapon /tmp/mnt/32GB/myswap.swp

Then the post-mount file contents will look like

#!/bin/sh
swapon /tmp/mnt/32GB/myswap.swp
pwr config --cpuwait on
Thanks for working. Another way without USB?
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture

quadra2030

Occasional Visitor
Texas Instruments should know about it very well - they invented first integrated circuit, TTL logic 74xx series, etc.. and supplied military applications (like semiconductors in rocket guidance systems) for 60 years.
 

bbunge

Very Senior Member
So, do we install or do we avoid?
If you are using Asus firmware you may not have a choice. It may upgrade itself (still waiting on reports to see if it does upgrade).
I'm cheaper than OE. Just send me $50.00. Or a new RT-AX68U when they come out.
 

DarkKnight75

Senior Member
If you are using Asus firmware you may not have a choice. It may upgrade itself (still waiting on reports to see if it does upgrade).
I'm cheaper than OE. Just send me $50.00. Or a new RT-AX68U when they come out.
Mine hasn't auto updated to the latest .386 version. Still on .384
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Texas Instruments should know about it very well - they invented first integrated circuit, TTL logic 74xx series, etc.. and supplied military applications (like semiconductors in rocket guidance systems) for 60 years.

As I read it, my router with CPU wait disabled will last far longer than I will ever want to keep it.

OE
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
Texas Instruments should know about it very well - they invented first integrated circuit, TTL logic 74xx series, etc.. and supplied military applications (like semiconductors in rocket guidance systems) for 60 years.

Not every chip is manufactured using the same process. For a very radical example, back in the day, logic gates could be TTL-based, or CMOS-based. TTL gates were far more resilient to voltage swings, however CMOS were more fragile, and more prone to get killed by electrostatic discharges.

Therefore, that study of TI's chip cannot be applied in any way to Broadcom's CPUs. The max Tjunc for instance isn't even the same.
 

follower

Senior Member
Not every chip is manufactured using the same process. For a very radical example, back in the day, logic gates could be TTL-based, or CMOS-based. TTL gates were far more resilient to voltage swings, however CMOS were more fragile, and more prone to get killed by electrostatic discharges.

Therefore, that study of TI's chip cannot be applied in any way to Broadcom's CPUs. The max Tjunc for instance isn't even the same.
I don't think so.
 

follower

Senior Member
Believe what you want. But I actually have a degree in electronics, so I have a pretty good idea on how this stuff works.
The most important things are Materials. Does Broadcom make CPUs with some kind of alien materials and technology? Interesting. I think you just believe what you think. There are so many papers about it, like this paper. My professors are idiots if I follow your theory.
 
Last edited:

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
I've had many professors who were idiots. I was young enough and smart enough to not let them know what I thought.

A title doesn't mean much. An IC designed for deep space, for example, would completely baffle you, I'm sure.
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
The most important things are Materials. Does Broadcom make CPUs with some kind of alien materials and technology? Interesting. I think you just believe what you think. There are so many papers about it, like this paper. My professors are idiots if I follow your theory.

It's not just about the materials. Other factors such as gate type, node density, voltage and current flowing through will make a difference. Some types of gates are more susceptible to electron migration than others.

This is why the max Tjunc isn't the same for every chips. Or why write endurance varies between different types of NANDs. The bcm4708, if I recall correctly, has a max Tjunc of around 120C. Meanwhile, a modern Intel CPU will have a max Tjunc of 105C.

So no, you cannot take the specs of a TI-designed CPU, and expect it to apply exactly as-is to a Broadcom-designed CPU. Different design, different node process, possibly different gate technology as well.
 

Yota

Regular Contributor
Believe what you want. But I actually have a degree in electronics, so I have a pretty good idea on how this stuff works.
wow, that's why Merlin firmware is so great. because we have you.
 

quadra2030

Occasional Visitor
Believe what you want. But I actually have a degree in electronics, so I have a pretty good idea on how this stuff works.

You are not only one here with degree in electronics (or solid state physics), I think.. and while we can argue about manufacturing process of particular ICs/SoCs (and there are big differences as you wrote), the TI study is still valid in general.

I wouldn't still run such SoC as in RT-AC86U at 90-100 °C for long time, even if it has 120 °C Tjunc (nor would design such device in that way).
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Top