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Thinking of switching from powerline to MOCA...

Discussion in 'MoCA, HomePlug, HPNA' started by ct1615, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. ct1615

    ct1615 Occasional Visitor

    Joined:
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    I currently use a pair of TP-Link AV600 (TL-PA6010) to provide an internet feed to an AP and roku in my master bedroom. The powerline adapters provide about 30mbps down of my potential 100mbps down from the ISP. I have no issue getting my full ISP speeds from the router itself. I recently tried a TP link powerline AV1200 kit and received the exact same performance as the AV600 kit. I don't want to pay for an ethernet line since we plan to move out of this home in a year or two.

    So I was curious about playing around with MOCA adapters for increased performance since we have coaxial in most rooms including right next to the router and where the roku is in the master bedroom. We don't have cable TV, just internet from the cable company, so we stream all our TV channels. I was thinking of purchasing two Motorola MM1000 adapters.

    In the basement I have the main coaxial feed from the street going into this three way splinter. I may have another splitter somewhere in the walls but I can't see it.

    my current splitter
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009FN72PO/?tag=snbforums-20

    So my questions would be; do I need a MOCA splitter to replace my current splitter? Do I need MOCA POE filters ( I know they are mostly for Tivo DVR issues but I figured can't hurt to ask)? Anything I am missing?
     
  2. krkaufman

    krkaufman Senior Member

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    First, you definitely need a "PoE" MoCA filter installed on the input of your main, initial 3-way splitter. The "PoE" MoCA filter is required to secure the MoCA network, as well as to improve the performance of the MoCA network. More info on "PoE" MoCA filters >here<. (TiVo's can network using MoCA, thus the confusion, I expect.)

    As for your existing splitters, they may work since MoCA was originally designed to work with cable splitters, but upgrading to splitters designed for MoCA (e.g. Holland's GHS-PRO-M series; specs; e.g.) should be considered if you have issues establishing a MoCA network or if the performance/statistics aren't satisfactory.

    As for what MoCA adapters to choose... the Motorola MM1000 is the best value for the fastest connection, bonded MoCA 2.0, but a budget option is the MoCA 1.1 Actiontec WCB3000N, currently $14 via Amazon. If you're in a FiOS region or have a friend who is, the FiOS Network Adapter may be something to look at. (See here for more MoCA adapter options, and associated bandwidth, keeping in mind that any two adapters will try to communicate at the highest spec supported by BOTH nodes.)

    You'll also want to make sure that any network switches are upgraded to Gigabit if looking to exceed 100 Mbps throughput.
     
    username0475 likes this.
  3. CaptainSTX

    CaptainSTX Very Senior Member

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    You may not need a MOCA filter if you don't get either video or DATA from your ISP using the cable. If the coxial coming into the house isn't be used for either then just disconnect it from the splitter.
     
  4. krkaufman

    krkaufman Senior Member

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    As mentioned in my earlier post, the "PoE" MoCA filter also serves a performance function, not just signal security.

    I've encountered a number of installs where MoCA connectivity wasn't functioning or broke down due to the absence of a MoCA filter properly installed at the point-of-entry. The performance boost of the "PoE" MoCA filter can be helpful in overcoming sub-optimal splitters and coax lines.
     
  5. ct1615

    ct1615 Occasional Visitor

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    Thank you for the replies, much appreciated.

    I don't have fios, our only option is optimum or Frontier and they don't offer fiber to your door.
     
  6. krkaufman

    krkaufman Senior Member

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    The FiOS mention was only in regards to having a way of obtaining a bonded MoCA 2.0 Actiontec ECB5240M, since they're only available to/through service providers. The FiOS Network Extender is a rebranded ECB5240M, so a heckuva deal at $5 less than a Motorola MM1000, especially for deployment at remote endpoint locations, given the 4 GigE ports.

    (And it might even be worth pursuing if you just had a friend with FiOS who could proxy the purchase and ship you the adapter.)

    edit: p.s. Moot, of course, if MoCA 1.1 is sufficient for your needs.
     
  7. sfx2000

    sfx2000 Part of the Furniture

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    When mixing different PowerLine kits - you might find speeds limited to the lowest common denominator - if you mix and match...

    AV1200 should provide around 200Mbps - depending on circuits and all that...

    MOCA 2.0 is likely going to give around the same - might do better in one direction. End of day - MOCA is interesting, but at the same time, not consumer friendly - Powerline (HPAV or G.Hn) still has a slight advantage as far as usability.

    Might also consider WiFi mesh solutions - which honestly, is the most consumer friendly these days.
     
  8. Samir

    Samir Very Senior Member

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    I think you don't even need to worry about the splitter if you're basically going to have just a coax wire between the 2 moca adapters.

    Moca should be much faster than powerline in even the most economical mix. I got 2 of the fios adapters cheap and in my testing they were linking at over 600Mbps with iperf testing showing just under 500Mbps. This is much higher than the same 30Mbps that I'm getting from my tp-link av600s (possibly the same model you have) or the 25Mbps from my netgear av500 nano. I like Moca a lot more than powerline if you've got coax right there.
     
    abailey likes this.
  9. tannebil

    tannebil Regular Contributor

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    My MoCA 2.0 bonded tests with iperf3 was consistently over 900Mbps. In theory it could be higher but I don't have any devices with adapters faster than GB. Latency is higher and it's more cluttered but throughput is great.

    It can get complicated trying to balance the sometimes conflicting needs of multiple uses of the same cable.

    I have not used powerline in a few years and is supposed to be dramatically better but my experience wasn't great with erratic speeds and it not working across the two sides of my breaker box. But it is less complex to implement than MoCA so you might want to give it a shot with returnable units.
     
  10. Samir

    Samir Very Senior Member

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    In my experience unless you're trying to make moca more than just a point to point link across a cable, it's just as easy to set up as powerline--and this is even considering I had to set up my frontier boxes first before I could use them as just pure powerline. I love powerline, but I love moca more. :D
     
  11. tannebil

    tannebil Regular Contributor

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    I'd agree for a single link. It's when you want to integrate coax amps, multiple splitters in unknown locations, or old, beat-up coax that it gets not so easy.