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Upgraded LAN - getting 100Mbps instead of 1Gbps

Discussion in 'Switches, NICs and cabling' started by mto, May 28, 2020.

  1. mto

    mto New Around Here

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2020
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    I upgraded my wired network in my home:
    • Prepared "patch cables" by myself which connect between a RJ45 Female plug to a device (RJ45 Male to Male connection).
    • Prepared "port-to-port cables" (within the walls) which have RJ45 Female to Female plug.

    The network connection is successful in all of them.

    But there's an issue with the speed (reported by Windows 10):
    • Some "port-to-port cables" show 100Mbps speed.
      These connections also take longer time until Windows successfuly connects.
    • Some "port-to-port cables" show 1Gbps speed.

    The connections which have 100Mbps - means that something is wrong in the cabling.

    But I don't understand why that happens?

    The instructions on how to connect RJ45 are really easy.
    I carefully followed them.
    And fact - Some of my connections are 1Gbps.

    Is there a known method to debug the issue?

    I appreciate your help.

    Edit:

    I'll emphasize:
    The issue is in the RJ45 Female to Female connection!
     
  2. ColinTaylor

    ColinTaylor Part of the Furniture

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    Buy a cheap RJ45 cable tester. That will tell you what the fault with your wiring is. It sounds like you haven't made the end connections properly.

    And by "Female plug" you mean "socket"? :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2020
    dosborne likes this.
  3. degrub

    degrub Very Senior Member

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    there have always been issues with using the least expensive terminations and the least expensive tool.
    There are recommendations in the forum about this, but i forget the brand.
     
    CaptainSTX likes this.
  4. CaptainSTX

    CaptainSTX Part of the Furniture

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    Platinum tools makes an excellent crimper for using their clam shell plugs. I have seen a similar knock off by Klein tools sold at Home Depot. Never used it as I have a Platinum crimper. Even with the best tools you still need to test every cable.

    Because of the difficulties of making perfect connections most people recommend that you buy factory made jumpers but before using any cable test it!
     
    Marin likes this.
  5. mto

    mto New Around Here

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    Could you please recommend of a cheap RJ45 cable tester from Amazon or eBay? I don't want to fall short (which mostly happens in cheap products).
    My needs from a RJ45/Ethernet tester are:
    • Able to measure a cable which its ends are in two different distant rooms.
    • Able to measure for a valid 1Gbps connection.
    • Preferably - tells you which ends of the cable is faulty
      (so that I won't have to guess..)

    LOL yeah I mean to a socket :D

    What do you mean?
    I didn't look for "the least expensive" - it's just what the seller provided - he provides this to many electricians which install these.
    The products which I used are Keystone RJ45 Cat6 Shielded socket/plug.
    (it might be CAT6a instead of CAT6)
    Nevertheless, I used a Cat5e F/UTP cable due to an insufficient space in the pipes within the walls (small diameter).

    I'll try to look into the forum.
    If you'll recall the brand, please let me know.

    Crimper is for the male-to-male cables, isn't it?
    In fact, I felt that my crimper isn't performing well, but I already finished with the RJ45-Male-to-Male-cables - for now they seem to be good.
    Currently, my issue is with the RJ45-Female-to-Female-cables.

    That's what I don't understand:
    why do we need to test every cable while the installation of these sockets are extremely easy & straightforward?
    I used the Keystone RJ45 Cat6 Shielded socket - something very similar to the attached picture.
    Notice that it has a plastic cover which helps to press the wires into their place - so you don't need a tool. (This is the tool-less version)

    What are these "clam shell plugs" ?
    Also what are these "factory made jumpers" ?
     

    Attached Files:

  6. degrub

    degrub Very Senior Member

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    "Nevertheless, I used a Cat5e F/UTP cable due to a..."

    "used the Keystone RJ45 Cat6 Shielded socket - so.."


    i always thought the connectors had to match the cable....
     
  7. ColinTaylor

    ColinTaylor Part of the Furniture

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    Most keystone jacks require you to use a punch down tool, although some keystones have a mechanism built in to do this automatically. Either way, if a wire isn't pushed down properly into the IDC it might not make a proper contact.
     
    Marin likes this.
  8. CaptainSTX

    CaptainSTX Part of the Furniture

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    Here is the tester I used. Not as cheap as it once was.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004Y75B5Y/?tag=snbforums-20

    If you want to find out about Platinum tools and the clamshell connectors and how they work go to their web site or YouTube and look at the videos.

    The problems that you are having are 99% probably do to bad terminations. Test and fix or learn to live with 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet connections.
     
    Marin likes this.
  9. mto

    mto New Around Here

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    As far as I know, this is not required.
    In my case, I wanted to get 1Gbps and Cat5e allows it.
    Therefore, I should've get 1Gbps despite of using a CAT6 connectors.
    So, my entire network is considered Cat5e.
    But, if you want a CAT6 network - then it is preferred that all (cables & connectors) network components are CAT6.

    Right. I used a keystone which is "tool-less", meaning you don't need the tool.
    Therefore, the installation is so simple.. yet I managed to fail to set it up properly.. I'm really surprised about this.
    (By "punch down tool" I suppose that you mean "Krone tool".)

    Cheers.

    "learn to live with 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet connections"
    LOL "100Mbps" and "Fast Ethernet connection" in one sentence , sure :D
    Only the thought of a malfunction cable in my house drives me nuts. I'LL FIX IT :cool: It's either the cable or me..
     
  10. dosborne

    dosborne Very Senior Member

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    Simple usually does not mean better (or even good). While I have no experience with the Keystone tool-less jacks, my preference would be a jack where I can examine and redo the connections as required. (i.e. a real (non plastic) bix punch tool)

    This reminds me of the problems people had with "twist on" cable connectors vs proper crimped connectors.
     
    CaptainSTX likes this.