why do i have STP packets showing in wireshark, home network?

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b24

New Around Here
i was under the impression that STP protocol had to be implemented by the router , for multiple routers on separate public ip addresses to be Bridged together as one mesh network ,so to speak.. as well as preventing overloading the bandwidth with duplicate packets but still i thought that STP needed to be turned on - off within the router and or switch ,
in my case i am on a home network with just one router and my home devices connected to the router.
i got to messing around with wireshark and noticed STP packets and now im looking for an answer on whether or not ive become the victim of a MITM attack or if my router is part of a bridged network with another router somehow.
i get how stp protocol works to a certain extent , by assigning a root bridge and then designating ports with the best path to the root bridge, i understand that all ports on the root bridge are in a forwarding state , and all ports in the root ports chose the best path to the root bridge, then the designated and blocking ports do their things as well , I'm not going to drag this out just explaining that i somewhat understand how STP protocol does work , i am just confused on if i need it in my home network, why i am seeing the packets , am i just being overly paranoid because i dont fully understand this.?
any help from someone who knows would be helpful.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
... for multiple routers on separate public ip addresses ...
I think you mean bridges and private IP addresses. You wouldn't use STP on the public internet.

Some routers (e.g. Asus) enable STP on the LAN by default. It's a "safe" option just in case the user has multiple LAN switches and accidentally cross-connects them creating a loop. While STP is unnecessary for most users the amount of additional traffic generated is negligible.
 
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