Wired LAN between main router and AiMesh node stay at 100 Mbps

  • ATTENTION! As of November 1, 2020, you are not able to reply to threads 6 months after the thread is opened if there are more than 500 posts in the thread.
    Threads will not be locked, so posts may still be edited by their authors.
    Just start a new thread on the topic to post if you get an error message when trying to reply to a thread.

iPa64

New Around Here
Hi,
I have just added my first AiMesh node:
Main AiMesh : RT-AC68U ( AP mode )
Second Aimesh : RT-AC67U

All seems to work wells, but I have have noticed that the wired link between this two AiMesh node stay at 100 Mbps ! Should not it be at 1Gbps?
The link is from LAN1 port on the first node to the WAN port on the second one.

Capture d’écran 2563-02-17 à 13.02.11.png

Capture d’écran 2563-02-17 à 13.57.57.png
 
Last edited:

JDB

Very Senior Member
Try a different cable


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

iPa64

New Around Here
Try a different cable
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Yes after few tests, that is the issue !
A poor quality china cable, need to buy a new one (25m) , and take my courage to go on the roof to change it.

Thank you
 

Grisu

Part of the Furniture
Might only be one connecter with poor contact to a pin, re-crimp it and should be fine, you might need a new connector, dont think the cable is bad on its own.
 

iPa64

New Around Here
This cable is labeled 5e.
I have a cable connections tester, and it pass the connection test ( a simple connection test, not a test for gigabit compliant )
 

Grisu

Part of the Furniture
5e is fully Gb complient at least for your short 25m length.
Read here last paragraph Cat5e vs Cat6: https://www.networkcablingdirectory.com/articles/structured-network-cabling-id_1151.htm

But not worth to search too long time for failure, cables are not that expensive.
And Asus ports are known to be somehow troublesome, often read here that they dont connect to a client on 1Gb, but they do after some hub or switch is installed between.
And you still can put it on spare for other testing or special need.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
@Patrick Monnier as @Grisu suggests too, instead of replacing the cable (sounds a little dangerous?), see if a cheap and cheerful little 4 port switch helps first. It may even be less than the cable itself and possibly infinitely easier to get in place too. :)
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Hi,
I have just added my first AiMesh node:
Main AiMesh : RT-AC68U ( AP mode )
Second Aimesh : RT-AC67U

All seems to work wells, but I have have noticed that the wired link between this two AiMesh node stay at 100 Mbps !

If all seems well at 100 Mbps, try the wireless backhaul... could be better than climbing on the roof.

OE
 

Smokindog

Senior Member
If you've got a wire I'd ditch AiMesh. It only adds complexity and takes away functionality.

Use it as an AP and regain control of your network and regain your radio that you sacrifice for AiMesh. AiMesh has a place but as a last resort, barely a step above power line adapters ;)

As @L&LD suggests, a switch may give the link the "boost" that it needs. Also as @Grisu suggests, if you have the tools and the talent you could try to replace the termination. Many times that's the issue. They used cheap connectors and/or poor QC for the crimp.

I run Gb over 5E to lengths of 200+ feet wo/issue. I also run HDBaseT across those same cables. Also remember that there's "electrically" connected at Gb and "throughput" connected :)
 

JDB

Very Senior Member
If you've got a wire I'd ditch AiMesh. It only adds complexity and takes away functionality.

Use it as an AP and regain control of your network and regain your radio that you sacrifice for AiMesh. AiMesh has a place but as a last resort, barely a step above power line adapters ;)

As @L&LD suggests, a switch may give the link the "boost" that it needs. Also as @Grisu suggests, if you have the tools and the talent you could try to replace the termination. Many times that's the issue. They used cheap connectors and/or poor QC for the crimp.

I run Gb over 5E to lengths of 200+ feet wo/issue. I also run HDBaseT across those same cables. Also remember that there's "electrically" connected at Gb and "throughput" connected :)

With ethernet backhaul there is no radio sacrifice with AiMesh (except on Tri-Band routers).
AiMesh has a lot of benefits over an AP, especially when used with Ethernet backhaul.
I for one rely on seemless BSSID handover for uninterrupted Wi-fi calling around the house - something you are unlikely to achieve with a dumb AP.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
@JDB with the advancements and improvements in the latest firmware and drivers, the handover may be just as good in AP as in AiMesh too. :)

Search/look for posts that show the increased capabilities/additional standards that the latest firmware offer/support. ;)
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Search/look for posts that show the increased capabilities/additional standards that the latest firmware offer/support.

Anyone know if the recent inclusion of these roaming protocols was noted in the firmware release notes... seems like something significant I missed. o_O

OE
 

JDB

Very Senior Member
Anyone know if the recent inclusion of these roaming protocols was noted in the firmware release notes... seems like something significant I missed. o_O

OE

Even if they are mentioned, I’d be sure they are referring to being used as part of AiMesh.
AP intelligence and collaboration is a must to achieve a consistent seamless roam environment that you don’t even notice on a phone call.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Even if they are mentioned, I’d be sure they are referring to being used as part of AiMesh.
AP intelligence and collaboration is a must to achieve a consistent seamless roam environment that you don’t even notice on a phone call.
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I don't think they were noted in any release notes. Which seems odd to me.

OE
 

Smokindog

Senior Member
With ethernet backhaul there is no radio sacrifice with AiMesh (except on Tri-Band routers).
AiMesh has a lot of benefits over an AP, especially when used with Ethernet backhaul.
I for one rely on seemless BSSID handover for uninterrupted Wi-fi calling around the house - something you are unlikely to achieve with a dumb AP.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You would think that but AiMesh will periodically and randomly change from wired to wireless backhaul. That may be a bug or it may be a "safety protocol" to ensure the link is available but either way it happens. I've asked in multiple venues and no one knows or no one will comment.

Also, AFAIK roaming is identical whether using AP mode or AiMesh mode. I have no issues whatsoever with roaming using multiple AP nodes. In fact it performs better as there is no forced frequency overlap that AiMesh imposes.

AiMesh only reduces capabilities and adds complexity vs AP mode if you've got a wire.
 
Last edited:

JDB

Very Senior Member
It absolutely does not switch between wired and wireless backhaul!!!! Mine is set to use wired backhaul only, however I have also set it to auto and it ALWAYS stays on wired backhaul mode.

I won’t waste my time explaining any more to you. I will only say that the roam assist protocols that exist specifically require AP’s to be aware of other BSSID’s and so will always provide a better steer suggestion to clients.
Enterprise Wi-fi systems have worked this way for 10 years and now we are seeing it become available to the home user market.
The protocols would not exist and router/AP manufacturers would not have invested millions of dollars over the last 10 years implementing and deploying them if they didn’t offer benefits over a cluster of dumb AP’s.

It appears you maybe have not had a good experience with AiMesh (at least I hope you are slating it based on experience and not your misguided thoughts), but remember that it is a new feature which was (wrongly or rightly) been brought to market at Beta stage in 2018 (Asus would very open about this fact). Only in the last 5-6 months would I say has AiMesh become a stable and release ready feature.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Smokindog

Senior Member
It absolutely does not switch between wired and wireless backhaul!!!! Mine is set to use wired backhaul only, however I have also set it to auto and it ALWAYS stays on wired backhaul mode.

I won’t waste my time explaining any more to you. I will only say that the roam assist protocols that exist specifically require AP’s to be aware of other BSSID’s and so will always provide a better steer suggestion to clients.
Enterprise Wi-fi systems have worked this way for 10 years and now we are seeing it become available to the home user market.
The protocols would not exist and router/AP manufacturers would not have invested millions of dollars over the last 10 years implementing and deploying them if they didn’t offer benefits over a cluster of dumb AP’s.

It appears you maybe have not had a good experience with AiMesh (at least I hope you are slating it based on experience and not your misguided thoughts), but remember that it is a new feature which was (wrongly or rightly) been brought to market at Beta stage in 2018 (Asus would very open about this fact). Only in the last 5-6 months would I say has AiMesh become a stable and release ready feature.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

OK so you can't list any quantifiable benefits. I get that.

I can tell you from experience I've observed that it absolutely does periodically and randomly switch to the radio backhaul and it absolutely does force overlapping frequencies of neighboring nodes. As I said, whether it's a bug and/or a safety protocol to "know" the fail over is available, it happens.

Saying that there are "a lot of benefits" and then not being able to articulate them doesn't bode well. I'd really like to see the list of benefits and how they've been quantified.

Anyway, enjoy AiMesh (which isn't a mesh BTW)!
 

iPa64

New Around Here
@Grisu Yes cat5e should work at Gb, but I think a lot of cheap cables are cat5 just labeled cat5e.

@L&LD Good idea, I will try with a switch, at least for the test.
@L&LD No it's not so dangerous to go in the roof, but it's a little acrobatic and above all it's very hot up there ( sun of thailand )

@Smokindog For now main benefits I saw ( for me ) it's that you manage only one node, and the setup to add nodes is fully automatised.
 

Smokindog

Senior Member
@Grisu Yes cat5e should work at Gb, but I think a lot of cheap cables are cat5 just labeled cat5e.

@L&LD Good idea, I will try with a switch, at least for the test.
@L&LD No it's not so dangerous to go in the roof, but it's a little acrobatic and above all it's very hot up there ( sun of thailand )

@Smokindog For now main benefits I saw ( for me ) it's that you manage only one node, and the setup to add nodes is fully automatised.
Unfortunately that also means you'll have frequency overlap which is a bad thing. An AP node is extremely easy to manage. I manage 5 and after selecting the frequencies for each I pretty much can ignore them. I will periodically wander around with a tool like WiFI Analyzer just to check.

Instead of 1-2 pages of setup you reset your node and make it an AP. Easy peasy!

Do yourself a favor and look into it. More control is always good!
 

Latest threads

Sign Up For SNBForums Daily Digest

Get an update of what's new every day delivered to your mailbox. Sign up here!
Top