1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
Dismiss Notice

Welcome To SNBForums

SNBForums is a community for anyone who wants to learn about or discuss the latest in wireless routers, network storage and the ins and outs of building and maintaining a small network.

If you'd like to post a question, simply register and have at it!

While you're at it, please check out SmallNetBuilder for product reviews and our famous Router Charts, Ranker and plenty more!

Featured Game On for Wi-Fi 6E

Discussion in 'General Wireless Discussion' started by thiggins, Apr 23, 2020.

Tags:
  1. Newfie

    Newfie Occasional Visitor

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2020
    Messages:
    13
    Apple Watch may never support 6Ghz. Does the latest Xbox or PS5 support this?
    I’m not even sure what network card is on the PS5 but I wonder if it’s even going to be AX if Sony follow the route they take. I’m sure the PS5 pro will though.

    I’m going to sit back and watch what happens over the next year or so and see how it all pans out.
     
  2. coxhaus

    coxhaus Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2010
    Messages:
    3,813
    Location:
    texas
    Yea I forgot about Apple watches when posting earlier. Yes I doubt Apple watches even are AC. They prefer 2.4GHz and I am only seeing 65 mbps.
     
  3. L&LD

    L&LD Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2013
    Messages:
    13,017
    For myself and my customers, the choice is always simple. On the devices I use to make my living with (or for the customers, their important devices), is there a noticeable benefit? If yes, then anything like a 'watch' or any other non-essential device would be relegated to 'it gets what it can' status.

    If a device is actually detrimental to the network (almost all legacy WiFi and IoT clients), then the choice is what is more important, now? Either remove the clients causing issues or put up with their blundering performance. Or, don't upgrade the WiFi hardware, yet (until those devices can be upgraded (if they can be upgraded) to something that behaves better with newer hardware).

    For myself, I prefer to drop any older client as soon as I can. Or, simply not use wearable tech if the real equipment (laptops, PC's and NAS') are affected adversely.

    This approach may be a reason why I have fewer issues with my network as a whole too. But one thing is for certain, after a day or two, those blundering devices are quickly forgotten without any regrets.

    Looked at another way, it's not a matter of how well the router can handle the clients that are important to me. It is how well the clients behave that determine if they will continue being used in the long term, in my network.

    Upgrading a network isn't about upgrading just the network infrastructure. The client devices are an integral part of that process too. This part is not something all customers 'get' easily. :)
     
  4. coxhaus

    coxhaus Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2010
    Messages:
    3,813
    Location:
    texas
    Yes I understand as I dumped all my 2.4 GHz clients years ago. The Apple watch will run off 5 GHz but I assume it runs the battery down faster if you use it on 5 GHz. And since I am running 2.4 GHz again I have not noticed it. I did not run 2.4 GHz for many years and was very happy.
     
    L&LD likes this.
  5. L&LD

    L&LD Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2013
    Messages:
    13,017
    With each new firmware upgrade on the device(s), I would be testing 5GHz once again. They may actually fix that arbitrary battery issue with the 'better' band, eventually.