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Broken power button

Discussion in 'ASUS AC Routers & Adapters' started by jvrobert, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. dlandiss

    dlandiss Senior Member

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    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    The other end of the cord works too. It is really such a small challenge to reach it since I need it only every few months.
     
  2. Pierino

    Pierino Very Senior Member

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    Columbus Ohio
    I unplug my routers when needed, even the ones with a switch.
     
  3. C. Hyde

    C. Hyde New Around Here

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    Feb 24, 2018
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    (yeah, unplugging is fine as long as you can unplug both from the outlet side AND from the device side, which is suspect is true for almost all routers...)

    ANYWAY, add another victim to the button issue... my router is an RT-AC66R, and I was at my computer and actually HEARD a little "ping" and then saw my internet access icon immediately go off. Sure enough, button had popped out and would not stay when I tried to press it in.

    I initially used duct tape to fix, but as many here have stated, it only last about 6 hours. I am now using one of those thick rubber bands that come on clusters of broccoli at the grocery store... took off the feet and one antenna to apply it.

    If this stops after a short time, I will try to add in the toothpick idea... will only try to take the router apart per the fix shown here as a last resort. Probably easy, but you never know what can go wrong...

    I am thinking there must be some device akin to a binder clip or a clamp with a screw in the middle such that you can clamp it on the back and then tighten the screw to push the button. Like a C clamp, except using a strong spring to clamp and with the screw instead going through the middle of the 'C' to tighten onto something else...
     
  4. videobruce

    videobruce Occasional Visitor

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    I can't believe you guys are using 'band-aid' fixes (at best). Toothpicks, screws, glue, sheesh. :rolleyes:
    Why not just open it up and either jump the contacts on the solder side, or better yet replace the switch. You may even be able to substitute a 'toggle switch' to replace that posh button w/o soldering a switch to the board.

    asus-rt-ac66u pwr switch top.jpg asus-rt-ac66u pwr switch PCB.jpg
     
  5. videobruce

    videobruce Occasional Visitor

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    The other deal that gets me is I find it hard to believe that micro miniature 1.3mm OD right angle coaxial plug (a disaster on both points) isn't a huge problem. I have never seen a 'barrel' plug that small. There is plenty of room for at least one that is 3.3mm OD & above. That is still less common to match the goofy 'Laptop voltage' (19.5v) that was chosen. :rolleyes:

    It's way too thin, and it blocks the power switch (unless these don't have a right angle plug).
     
  6. dlandiss

    dlandiss Senior Member

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    Beware of that approach. Some have reported that there is also a pair of shorting contacts in the switch that close when it is "off."
     
  7. videobruce

    videobruce Occasional Visitor

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    Good point. Best to just remove the switch, it looks like there are only 5 solder points. Of course a DMM would be a starting requirement. ;)
     
  8. wouterv

    wouterv Very Senior Member

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    979
    I still suggest the safe and easy approach (no glue, no toothpick, no duct tape, no soldering, no new parts):
    https://www.snbforums.com/threads/broken-power-button.13601/page-4#post-228266

    I agree that the power socket and plug of the RT-N66U/RT-AC66U are very tiny and not well located, due to careful treatment it still survived on my RT-N66U.
    Since some time the blue LED's are degrading.
    For now the RT-N66U serves fine as Media Bridge, connected to the RT-AC68U.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
  9. Keenan

    Keenan Regular Contributor

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    California
    I popped the cover on the case, pulled the spring out of the switch, pushed it down until it set, and put the cover back on. While I haven't used the router for a few months now as I installed an AC86U, it worked perfectly fine for the few months after the fix. I just used the power cord to turn it on and off.
     
  10. hank81

    hank81 Regular Contributor

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    Jan 28, 2015
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    Location:
    Valencia, Spain
    LEDs on my RT-AC68 are also very degraded. After 4 years the ones that are 24h lighted on are only visible in dark. I had to switch on the stealth mode to prevent them from failing off completely.

    Sent from my XT1635-02 via Tapatalk
     
  11. RMerlin

    RMerlin Super Moderator

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    Or you could remove the accumulated layer of dust ;)
     
    hank81 likes this.
  12. Widmark

    Widmark Occasional Visitor

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    Dec 7, 2011
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    I joined the club on my RT-AC66U. What a weird way to lose internet!

    Opened it up after removing screws, pulled the spring, and 10 minutes later back in business. I’ve had this router a long time and ASUS is still supporting updates... have had Linksys, D-Link...and ASUS is still the best at this price point and I will buy another one when ready. Hopefully they spent a few more cents for better switches on newer models though.
     
  13. dchang0

    dchang0 Occasional Visitor

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    Sorry for the necropost.

    For those of you who like me want to DIY replace the power button, it appears to be an E-Switch LC-1258-EE-NP latching SPDT pushbutton switch.

    Mouser carries them for 76 cents each, p/n 612-LC1258EENP

    I have yet to confirm 100% that it is the correct switch, but it looks identical, and I've taken some physical measurements and it appears to be a match.

    These are the physical measurements I confirmed with digital calipers:

    length of metal case = 12mm
    width of metal case = 5mm
    length of blue plastic actuator fully extended = 10mm
    width of blue plastic actuator = 2.8mm (E-Switch refers to this as Shaft End Style A)
    pin spacing = 2.50mm

    I also measured the PCB hole layout and it appears to be a perfect match.

    According to the schematic, it is either in one of two electrical connections:

    actuator out: pin 1 shorted to pin 2
    actuator in: pin 2 shorted to pin 3


    My plan is to order a few to repair the two ASUS RT-N66U or RT-N66R routers that have failed on me. After doing so, I'll come back and let you all know if it is indeed the correct part.

    Why bother replacing a switch that we know will go bad in 3 years? Well, I have found this router to be rock-solid in terms of performance and reliability. The only time I really have to use the power button is for firmware updates, not to resolve a problem.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2019
    wouterv, Keenan and L&LD like this.
  14. Grisu

    Grisu Very Senior Member

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    1,710
    Why that much work and search for an irrelevant switch?

    Just solder a connection (bridge) on the relevant pin 2 to pin 3 and everything is good (pin 1 to 2 has no relevance).

    Nobody needs a power switch on a permanent-on router!

    It is the same affort to plug off/on the power-plug (into the router beside the switch) or to press the power switch twice.

    The switch makes nothing different than a plug, just disconnect power supply from MB.
    Dont mix it with unplug adapter from the wall, because then there still resumes charge in the adapter and its not "fully" powered off!
     
  15. Keenan

    Keenan Regular Contributor

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    Location:
    California
    I just removed the button tension spring(so it's permanently on) and just pull the plug when I need to reboot it.
     
  16. dchang0

    dchang0 Occasional Visitor

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    Just a matter of personal preference. I like having a working power button. Most people won't care and will try some of the other solutions like hot glue, taping a dime over the button, removing the spring, soldering a jumper, etc. A few like me will care and want a working power button.

    It wasn't hard for me to find the part since I do circuit design and am always looking through the Mouser and Digikey databases. Measuring parts is also second-nature since I'm always having to fit as many parts into as small a PCB as possible.

    Anyway, I posted up the part number since nobody else seems to have done so on here or any other site. My doing the research will save some other people the trouble once they find this thread. In a week or two I'll have the part in hand and will confirm 100% if it is the exact part.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2019
    L&LD likes this.
  17. Grisu

    Grisu Very Senior Member

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    its up on you how you fix it!
    And of course it's the best way to do.

    I only wanted to tell different ways for others who doesnt want to buy and solder new switches.

    And how to avoid that the switch even goes bad!
    If you use the plug most of the time your switch will last forever ;)

    PS: But for sure, those reading these lines are already in the situation of a broken switch - too late for them ...
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2019
  18. dchang0

    dchang0 Occasional Visitor

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    Yeah, this is my third failed power switch in three different routers. The first one was under warranty. I sent it to ASUS and got a replacement, which just failed today (the third failed router).

    I used the tape and dime approach on the second failed router but found it far too annoying to unplug the power cable. It's on top of a high shelf in a closet at a customer site, and I have to stand on a step stool and reach up, blindly trying to plug the tiny barrel plug back into the power jack hole. (The CAT5e cables that come out of the wall are very short, so I can't just take the whole router down off the shelf without unplugging everything, which would then require more fumbling around blindly trying to plug everything back in.)

    Anyway, after a whole lot of cursing over the years over that second router with the taped dime, when this third router failed, I spent 5 minutes finding the part and 15 minutes measuring it. I'll go back and fix the second router and this third one with a working power switch and be good for another 3 years.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2019
    L&LD likes this.
  19. RMerlin

    RMerlin Super Moderator

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    Just use that as an excuse to buy a new router :cool:
     
  20. dlandiss

    dlandiss Senior Member

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    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    It is my understanding that in at least some models there IS an important difference between the switch and just pulling the plug. Some models apparently use the second set of switch contacts to short the power supply to ground when turned off, thus instantly discharging the capacitors.

    Just soldering the contacts closed but leaving the switch physically in the off position would create a situation in which the power supply was trying to energize but was looking at a short circuit to ground--not good for power supply life.

    If anyone has examined the switch wiring with the cover off, can you confirm true or false for that?

    Thank you.
     
    jsbeddow likes this.