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Ethernet from your TV Outlet: NETGEAR MoCA Coax-Ethernet Adapter Kit Reviewed

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corndog

Regular Contributor
Tim,

You're not the only one waiting for simple consumer-purchasable MoCA. I have been using Motorola NIM-100 devices from eBay for years, and have found exactly the same thing you have with the Netgears - MoCA "just works". It's something of a relief to see that the Netgears seem to work as well as the Motorola's - although I guess since they both use the Entropic c.link solution, it's not surprising.

Great review!
 
Glad you liked the review, corndog. I was going to mention the NIM100's but ended up not working it in.
 
Nice

Great review.

One thing out of interest, I doubt it would make any difference based on the numbers you saw, but was the splitter you used for the second setup rated for frequencies above 1GHz? I only ask because I saw from the MoCA spec and your review that some of the channels it uses are on frequencies above 1GHz, and most coax splitters are only rated up to 1GHz. So, long story short, I was curious if it made any difference using a full 5MHz-2GHz variant versus a regular 5MHz-1GHz, but like I said, your numbers seemed to answer that question already.. Presumably, the larger range just opens up those channels as options for the adapters to use, but wondered if there was any performance advantage with that.

Otherwise, glad to see at least one manufacturer is finally releasing a MoCA consumer product. Been waiting for these since D-Link originally announced theirs over a year ago (what a let down, btw). Currently have and use both 802.11n and HomePlug AV at home. HP AV has been adequate for Slingbox streams, including HD channels, which I think Sling compresses the hell out of (on top of what Comcast already does), but I've still seen the bandwidth vary widely at times over those. Would like to have the more reliable throughput of these MoCA adapters in the house. Was about to break down and buy some NIM100s from eBay, but think I'll wait for these now thanks to your review.

Again great review, thanks.
 
One thing I'd be VERY concerned with when connecting it to cable is that you're also transmitting the signal through the input of the splitter and then to the cable plant. I wonder what would happen if you connected a third device to another tap at the CATV pedestal or pole... would it also connect if there was no device to device security?

As a Satellite customer I'll pass as this device doesn't appear to function in the environment I have but I'm also interested in learning how to get the device to work with a satellite system. I'm not your average consumer and could potentially accomplish a working install...
 
The splitter didn't have any frequency range marked on it. But, as you said, it must have passed enough signal for good throughput. MoCA is designed to work over a 50+ dB signal range. So it can withstand a good deal of loss.
 
One thing I'd be VERY concerned with when connecting it to cable is that you're also transmitting the signal through the input of the splitter and then to the cable plant. I wonder what would happen if you connected a third device to another tap at the CATV pedestal or pole... would it also connect if there was no device to device security?
Same issue as with powerline. That's why there is the option of security. The signal also can't travel back through amplifiers. And I'd imagine there are a few of those between homes and the cable plant.

As a Satellite customer I'll pass as this device doesn't appear to function in the environment I have but I'm also interested in learning how to get the device to work with a satellite system. I'm not your average consumer and could potentially accomplish a working install...
You would need to put the device in All pass mode, then install an external diplexer to restrict operation to frequencies that don't interfere with your particular satellite system.
 
Tim, as a multiple-Macintosh user without a single Windows machine at home, I ask:
1) Did you need to use the installation CD that NetGear says comes with the MCAB-1001, and if so, what's on it?
2) Would you please try accessing the device's built-in administrative web browser with a browser other than IE--it would be great if you could try it from a Macintosh? NetGear's spec sheet says the MCAB-1001 requires Windows XP or Vista, but the Indian NetGear tech support person I talked to today says that recent NetGear devices will work with any modern browser (he may not know what he is talking about).
 
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Can I use this with a switch?

Hi Tim,

After researching numerous alternatives over recent days, I just learned of MoCA, and this product, today. Great review, thank you.

This is just what I want, for all the reasons you cited. One question;
Each unit has only one ethernet port. I want to connect both a TiVo and a BD player. I contacted Netgear TS to ask if I could connect a switch. they promptly replied with the following message:

"We are sorry to inform you that MCA1001 does not have DHCP server so it cannot be connected to 2 devices.Thanks again for choosing NETGEAR. Have a great day!"

This is disappointing, but before giving up on this solution, I wanted to seek your expertise. Would not the IP's be assigned by the router that the upstream MCA would be connected to? If not, is there any other way to connect two (or more) devices to the downstream MCA? (Figure 15 in your review seems to show a switch in the loop. Is the true?)

Thanks for your attention.
 
I have to check, David, but I don't recall using the CD. I used FF on an XP machine.
I didn't see anything fancy in the web interface that wouldn't run on any browser.
 
That was a very uninformed tech that "answered" you, BobG. The MCA1001 is a bridge and will pass multiple MAC addresses. So yes you can use it with switches on both ends and and yes, your router would handle DHCP through it just fine.
 
An Alternative

Hi Tim,
Thanks for confirming that for me.

In continuing to research MoCA, I just came across a similar product made by Gefen, that is currently available (the Netgear product is not yet available.) It's called Gefen TV Ethernet over Coax, #GTVETH2COAX.

Are you familiar with this product, and if so, if there any reason not to consider it instead of the Netgear unit? (I'm particularly eager to get a solution in place.)

Thank you.
 
The Gefen product is not MoCA, but uses UPA powerline over coax. It is not intended to be connected into an active coax network.

If you're really in a rush, hit eBay and buy some Motorola NIM100's. NETGEAR said that product should be in stores within the next few weeks.
 
Download the user manual and see page 31:
"Standard Support ................................................. UPA DHS (200 Mbps) PLC"
 
Guys,

I think this discussion is going around in circles because we need to clearly name the standards.

1. There is MoCA, which specifies how to transmit ethernet frames over Coaxial cable.
2. There is HPNA, which originally specified transmitting ethernet frames over home phone lines and then was extended to also include Coaxial cable.
3. There is UPA DHS which originally specified sending ethernet frames over Home power lines and then also was extended to include Coaxial cable.

Everyone is going towards Coax cabling because electrically it has the most promising possibilities for carry a LOT of information. However, some of these standards are designed to work with live TV on the same cable, while others are not. Most of them also will not work with digital satellite info, even if they may work with analog TV signals.

Just to clarify. Carry on...
 
Technetix ECS-1001 Ethernet over Coax injector ?

And how about the ECS-1001, as described here :

http://www.cyberselect.co.uk/range/1220

Would that deliver the same target, i.e. transmitting ethernet-signals over a coax-cable ?

Just bumped into that one, when I was looking for ethernet-over-coax ...
 
Looks like I made a mistake ....

Thanks to both of you for your notes.

I had downloaded and read the user manual, but I hadn't understood the distinction between UPA DHS and Moca that you've now explained.

This product is apparently not Moca, but it IS ethernet over cable and is intended to work over coax, not over powerlline. Note that the actual name of the product specifies coax, and it has coax ports, not powerline connections. But perhaps it is only intended to work with dedicated coax which is not also carrying a television signal.

If that's the case, it's not clear to me how the product would be used (unless the user had a second coax line in the wall). (???)

Looks like I'd better wait for the Netgear MoCA units.
 
So, I now understand that there are other forms of sending "Ethernet over Coax", but that only MoCA will work over coax that is also in use for cable TV signals.

Could you please confirm if that is correct?
Thanks.
 
So, I now understand that there are other forms of sending "Ethernet over Coax", but that only MoCA will work over coax that is also in use for cable TV signals.

Could you please confirm if that is correct?
Thanks.
Without investigating the details of each non MoCA product, I can't say for sure.

MoCA is the standard that the Consumer Electronics industry seems to be rallying around. It has been extensively tested and is intended to coexist with OTA and cable TV signals on the same coax. I do not know whether the other technologies support coexistence.

If you decide to buy a non MoCA product, you need to do your own homework to see if the product requires dedicated coax or can work over coax that is carrying other RF.
 

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