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Frontier internet and Moca

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kps246

Occasional Visitor
I recently got Frontier fiber internet installed. The tech installed a FCA252 (set to 25GW), and connected it to my Deco
X75 Pro mesh system. I don't have cable TV any more, so I want to set up a wired internet utilizing a Moca connection.
I looked inside the ONT box, and there is not another Moca adapter in it. There is a light on the unit that's labeled Moca,
so I'm assuming it's built in. I bought 4 FCA252 adapters and hooked them up. I used a 2 way splitter and ran one to my X75,
and set the switch to LAN. I installed the others at 3 other locations. All the lights are on except the Moca light on the FCA252
that's connected to the X75. I have no wired connection at this point. I have a POE filter, but haven't installed it yet. Any ideas
on what I've done wrong?
 
All the lights are on except the Moca light on the FCA252 that's connected to the X75.
Quick guess … this would indicate that there is a direct coax connection between the ONT and router location, but that the rest of your coax locations are interconnected via a splitter isolated from the ONT/router connection. (Or possibly a misplaced MoCA filter.)

The ONT coax needs to feed the input port of your distribution splitter, with the router location’s coax added as an output — replacing or supplementing the splitter, as needed. A MoCA filter would offer some performance benefit installed on the input port of the first splitter encountered by the ONT coax line.

Example diagram:

IMG_2654.jpeg

(Of course, the add’l FCA252[25GW] adapter at the ONT would be skipped if your ONT supports the custom MoCA WAN frequency natively.)

edit: p.s. I’m assuming all the FCA252 adapters used for the MoCA LAN have been set to their “LAN” configuration setting.
 
There's an access panel in my garage I'll have to get into. I do remember him unhooking something in there. I'll have to move a bunch of stuff to get to it. I'll do that tomorrow and get back to you. I'll take some pictures also.
 
Here's the pictures from my access box. The original setup was a 2 way splitter
into the 4 way splitter. Looks to me like he has bypassed my whole coax system and just connected to 1 coax which goes to the office where the router is, which is right behind the panel. I also see the splitters aren't Moca compatible. Do I just need to replace the splitters and then unhook the ones he has barreled together and reconnect them to the 2 way splitter?
 

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Do I just need to replace the splitters and then unhook the ones he has barreled together and reconnect them to the 2 way splitter?
That's the basics of it...
The ONT coax needs to feed the input port of your distribution splitter, with the router location’s coax added as an output — replacing or supplementing the splitter, as needed. A MoCA filter would offer some performance benefit installed on the input port of the first splitter encountered by the ONT coax line.
... though I recommend right-sizing the MoCA-compatible splitter -- sized to only connect the required lines -- as well as, as diagrammed, adding a MoCA filter to the splitter's input port to improve the MoCA LAN network efficiency. (The MoCA WAN network, operating at 400-900 MHz, will slip through the MoCA filter, as the filter is spec'd to block Band D [1125-1675 MHz] MoCA signals.)

That said, short-term, you could probably get it working using just the 4-way splitter,, given you only have 3 MoCA adapters available for the MoCA LAN (AP + 2 remote nodes = 3 distribution splitter outputs; capping the unused output port w/ a 75-ohm terminator).
.
 
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Thanks for your help. I'll have to order the splitters from Amazon. I only have 5 coax outlets in my house, so all the runs should be homeruns with no hidden splitters. I'll let you know how it works out when i get it put back together.
 
Here's the pictures from my access box. ... just connected to 1 coax which goes to the office where the router is, which is right behind the panel.
20240219_103615.jpg
Looks like you have a few network-capable Cat5+ lines in that cabinet, as well, though currently connected for landline use (likely incoming telephone service line + 2 outlets). Something to keep in mind depending on where the phone jacks are located (where the Cat5+ lines run), and where you want wired networking. The media panel being near the Office should allow for additional lines, if needed, to link the lines to your router LAN.
.
 
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Thanks for your help. I'll have to order the splitters from Amazon. I only have 5 coax outlets in my house, so all the runs should be homeruns with no hidden splitters. I'll let you know how it works out when i get it put back together.
p.s. Added a post-edit comment ... that you should be able to get your MoCA LAN setup working w/ just the current 4-way (or probably even with the 2 splitters connected as pictured), though at lower efficiency (requiring more power to boost MoCA signals) and possibly with degraded throughput. Then just replace the components once the MoCA-optimized bits arrive.

p.s. If the splitter used isn't right-sized, any unused, inactive lines should be capped w/ a 75-ohm terminator.
 
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I have a pretty good wireless system that I'll continue to use until the components get here. I live in Florida in a concrete block house. The router is not centrally located, so streaming can be spotty, especially in the evening hours. Want the wired connection for a more stable signal.
 
Just thought I'd update you on what I ended up doing. I have a TP-Link x75 by each TV. I ran the ethernet cable from the FCA252 to my X75, I then ran another ethernet to a 1 gig USB ethernet adapter, then to an OTG cable, then to a Firestick. I am getting a consistent 340- 360mbps on all my TV'S (4), and have a super hard wired wifi system also. Thanks again.
 

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OTG cable,
Had to look that one up. So a USB form factor adapter, basically? And the 340-360 Mbps is about all the Firestick can do, right?

Sounds great. Thanks for the feedback; hope you have some time to enjoy it…
 

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