Kernel UDB message within Syslog

sipankh

Occasional Visitor
My apology if someone has the asked same or similar, but I was unable to locate the subject.

Someone who is SME, can you explain what these messages mean within Asus rt syslog and how should it be addressed, if at all?

Router in question is RT-AX86U running AsusWrt-Merlin version 386.7_2 and has AiMesh enabled with mesh being ran alongside Asus RT-AC68U running the same firmware as 86 one, and Asus RP-AC55 running stock firmware

Syslog lines are:
Sep 15 16:34:51 kernel: FC:34:97:35:D6:F5 not exist in UDB, can't delete it
Sep 15 16:35:21 kernel: B8:A1:75:F4:49:00 not mesh client, can't update it's ip
Sep 15 16:36:22 kernel: FC:34:97:35:D6:F1 not exist in UDB, can't delete it
Sep 15 16:36:52 kernel: B8:A1:75:F4:49:00 not mesh client, can't update it's ip

Thank you for any insight someone has about this.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
They're just information messages that serve no real purpose for the end user. I'm surprised you're seeing them at all as Asus has recently taken to hiding those messages.
 
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sipankh

Occasional Visitor
There's just information messages that serve no real purpose for the end user. I'm surprised you're seeing them at all as Asus has recently taken to hiding those messages.
Well, first thank you for the timely response.

The reason I asked is the fact that in general UDB style db is being used to register all known users and/or devices. Depending on what environment are we dealing with UDB. For example, large MSO's (like cable media companies that provide various services including ISP-style access; a/v streaming, security etc...) have UDB server farms that are used for similar purposes. Registering known paying clients and their devices as they log in at home or remotely, and adding them to a pre-approved list of devices that are allowed to use certain services. etc,...

That said and based on how these log entries appear within my router's Syslog,I tend to believe that these UDB messages serve similar purpose. Interestingly they do show up on when one runs AiMesh otherwise these messages are likely as you indicated hidden. It still leads me to believe it is a similar function on Asus routers and is managed by kernel. Why? Well since I am freak who retains syslog info up to 18 months and store it on a remote server with which I play bit of ML I noticed that the above example (while there are other) one mac address belongs to a device that is live on my network but seldom used so likely most of the traffic is keep alive one, while the second mac address belongs to a device that has not been on my network for months since it belonged to a visitor.

I still wonder how, without potentially bricking the router, one can have access to that UDB db on Asus or if kernel only based ie part of firmware code in some capacity are the firmware developers aware of what I see a potential bug or if there is a detailed explanation what in this case is it or rather what purpose does it serve if not what I am suggesting?
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Sorry, I'm not understanding your usage of UDB and ML or what you're suggesting is a bug? I think you might be confusing "UDB" with enterprise relational databases, like Oracle, DB2, etc. The router doesn't run or connect to a relational database server anywhere. It does however hold small amounts of information about clients and AiProtection data in local SQLite compatible "UDB"-type files. These files are only a few megabytes in size.
 

sipankh

Occasional Visitor
Sorry, I'm not understanding your usage of UDB and ML or what you're suggesting is a bug? I think you might be confusing "UDB" with enterprise relational databases, like Oracle, DB2, etc. The router doesn't run or connect to a relational database server anywhere. It does however hold small amounts of information about clients and AiProtection data in local SQLite compatible "UDB"-type files. These files are only a few megabytes in size.
You are right on the money and we are on the same page. In short, when I indicated ML,I was referring to the fact aggregate my syslog data and parse it with ML type of code to analyze that syslog data and hence how I figured the syslog udb references are legit hosts that are either on the net or been at some point.

Is there a way to query or view those files?
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
I'm not familiar with "ML" code.

Is there a way to query or view those files?
You can use any software that understands SQLite files. For example: https://sqlitebrowser.org/

The router has the sqlite3 command if you prefer command line queries.

P.S. Look for files in the /jffs filesystem that end in ".db".
 
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sipankh

Occasional Visitor
I'm not familiar with "ML" code.


You can use any software that understands SQLite files. For example: https://sqlitebrowser.org/

The router has the sqlite3 command if you prefer command line queries.

P.S. Look for files in the /jffs filesystem that end in ".db".
ML = I play with machine learning /writing code and utilize various tools to do some low-level analysis. Irrelevant to this inquiry re udb kernel error this thread is started for, other than me catching pattern of mac addresses, IP's etc..

Thank you for the tips. Will play around with it.
 

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