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RT-AC66U mediabridge 5GHz not available

Discussion in 'Asuswrt-Merlin' started by markus987, Oct 20, 2019.

  1. markus987

    markus987 New Around Here

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    Hi
    I am trying to setup my RT-AC66U in mediabridge mode. Unfortunately it does not connect over 5GHz band (2.4 GHz is fine). The GUI does not show up any 5GHz networks while scanning networks. Entering the 5GHz band manually doesn't work either.

    Is this a hardware or a software limitation? I have asuswrt-merlin v. 380.70 installed on the device.
    Thanks
     
  2. Grisu

    Grisu Part of the Furniture

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    Which 5G channel is your master router using?
    Change to ch. 36 could help if its on an by 66U unsupported channel now.
     
  3. L&LD

    L&LD Part of the Furniture

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    Did you just recently flash that firmware? If so, did you do a full reset to factory defaults before switching to Media Bridge mode? When was the last time a full reset was performed?

    If you're not seeing any 5GHz networks and you should be in your area, had you disabled the 5GHz radio before switching to Media Bridge mode?

    Does the 5GHz band work when the mode is set to a router?
     
    royarcher likes this.
  4. Val D.

    Val D. Very Senior Member

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    Media Bridge doesn't work properly on 380.70, change it to 380.66 and try again. See my signature.
    If your 5GHz radio on that RT-AC66U is working properly, then you should have no issues with 380.66.
     
  5. markus987

    markus987 New Around Here

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    That's it. I had Channel Bandwith 80MHz on my main router. Looks like the 66U only support 20 or 40MHz.
    I Switched to 40MHz on my main router. Now it works perfect :)
     
    L&LD, royarcher and Grisu like this.
  6. Grisu

    Grisu Part of the Furniture

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    And now you can test with auto 20/40/80, then clients should be able to connect with any bandwith.
     
  7. Val D.

    Val D. Very Senior Member

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    RT-AC66U supports 80MHz wide channel on 5GHz. RT-N66U supports 40MHz only.

    Clients can connect with 20/40MHz wide channel even if the router is set to 80MHz.
     
  8. Grisu

    Grisu Part of the Furniture

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    OMG, you are a hero in ingnoring facts which doesn't fit your mind.
    He got a AC66U as you could read in his first posting while N66U doesnt support 5G, no reason to mention it at all.

    However, he could not connect with 80MHz bandwith and solved it by changing to 40MHz.
    So I wrote him to try now auto bandwith 20/40/80 instead of fix 80MHz which did not work for him.
    I can't tell you why but it solved his issue, no need to offend me for a helpful hint.
    You still believe its a perfect world, no it isn't and there are obscure failures you can't imagine.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2019
  9. Val D.

    Val D. Very Senior Member

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    I just want to see technically correct information posted here on SNB.

    1. RT-N66U is a dual band router and of course supports 5GHz, some people confuse the two due to similar name
    2. OPs issue is definitely not the channel bandwidth, he basically lost half of the performance with the "solution" above

    See my singnature - RT-AC66U, Media Bridge, 80MHz channel - 1300Mbps link speed
     
  10. markus987

    markus987 New Around Here

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    My main router is a RT-AC87U model with latest merlin stable.

    I have switched my 5GHz channel bandwith to 80 MHz and set Control Channel to 36. It works my AC66U can connect to the 5GHz network. Originally I have set the 5GHz Control Channel to Auto and it had selected a channel the AC66U cannot see.
    A channel bandwith setting of 20/40/80 is not available on the AC87U.

    Thanks for the help!
     
    Val D. likes this.
  11. Grisu

    Grisu Part of the Furniture

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    Ok, N66U even supports 5G with 802.11n (limited to 40 MHz ) but I never have seen such clients so 11n is mostly meant to be used with 2.4G.
    All 5G clients here supports AC, same like 5G 11a, defined but hardly seen anywhere, maybe there has been some more in US, dont know.
     
  12. ColinTaylor

    ColinTaylor Part of the Furniture

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    All 802.11ac clients can connect with 802.11n on 5GHz, it's part of the specification. My macbook pro happily connected to my N66U on 5GHz at 450Mbps.
     
  13. Grisu

    Grisu Part of the Furniture

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    Why should one go 20 on a highway when you could 70? :D
    Its as outdated as 11b while 11b at least has been used a lot some time ago.
     
  14. ColinTaylor

    ColinTaylor Part of the Furniture

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    I don't think anyone's suggesting that it's desirable, just that it's possible.

    FYI there were a lot of laptops sold by companies like Dell, Lenovo, etc. with WiFi adapters (e.g Intel 5300, 6300, 6235, 7260AGN, 7265AN, etc.) that were n-only on 5GHz. Thankfully they're no longer that common. After all, why would Asus create the RT-N66U if there weren't any devices that could connect to it.
     
  15. Val D.

    Val D. Very Senior Member

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    In addition to 80+ million iPhone 5s and iPad Air, all dual band N devices.

    @Grisu, seriously man, you missed an entire period in WiFi technology.
     
  16. Grisu

    Grisu Part of the Furniture

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    I dont know too, why did they ever develop Lyra to be EoL before it ever worked reliable?
    Maybe, but it was worth it and I dont see any "technology" (advancement) in doing so, just the same with bader frequencies!
    All these devices connected to 2.4G with same or mostly better speed due to much less attanuation and internet speeds has been about <10Mb/s, so everything fine without 5G-n, no need for it neither 10 years ago nor now.
    Jump in technology has been 2.4G-b -> 2.4G-g/n -> 5G-AC and now maybe AX for both bands (still has to be proved in real life with many clients).
    Same with Mu-MiMo, hardly to be seen as an advantage and everywhere you can read better turn off.
    Seriously, we never had any bitten fruits :p

    But its ok, we have just different point of views and focus on technology.
    If we all would have same opinions the earth would still be flat!
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2019
  17. Val D.

    Val D. Very Senior Member

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    @Grisu, remember my advice to you to read more before you write?
    People share opinions on something they know. Your opinion on something you don't know has no real value.

    - Wireless N move to 5GHz was actually the biggest step forward in WiFi, advantage used today with AC/AX
    - Real throughput on 5GHz was actually much higher compared to 2.4GHz due to less networks on 5GHz
    - 5GHz band allowed real achievable link speeds of 300-450Mbps, very rare case for 2.4GHz band
    - Wireless N on 5GHz was used everywhere and is still in use today, consumer and business sectors
    - Faster WiFi means also faster connection between devices, no matter what the Internet connection speed is/was
    - N900 class routers were very common, even many ISP provided ones were dual-band N routers

    When people started getting in their hands the first AC devices what happened is exactly the same what happens today with the first AX devices - due to back compatibility they got connected to the existing router. No one will rush to upgrade the router immediately after getting the first new WiFi standard device. First AC devices worked on 5GHz N routers exactly the same way as first AX devices work on AC routers most of us have today. WiFi networks were mixed N and AC devices on a N router first, then people slowly upgraded to AC routers still using existing N and more new AC clients, both on 5GHz.

    I had to deal with a big company recently still using HP Thin Client stations with Wireless N on 5GHz. And they are not in a rush to upgrade soon, because the 150-180Mbps throughput they get to/from each client (270-300Mbps link speeds) is exceeding few times the throughput needed for normal operations. I also still have a perfectly working iPad Air, as well as HP Probook 640 thin and light laptop, both connecting happily with 5GHz Wireless N and getting up to 200Mbps access to Internet and to other devices on the network. My DIY Weather Station (Samsung Galaxy Pad 4) is also connecting at 5GHz Wireless N. Actually, I don't use 2.4GHz since RT-N66U times. Before that I had a mixed 2.4GHz and 5GHz network on a Cisco E2500, also a dual band N router (N600 class).

    The fact you have stuck to 2.4GHz for a very long time and you never needed/used/knew faster networks is actually surprising for a developed country you live in. I currently live in North America, but I'm European too and I know well what was available and what people were using years ago in Europe.