(Solved) Asus RT-AX55 no internet wireless and wired

SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
Recently, got my rt-ax55 today, after setting it up using the asus router up, there was no connection in my phone and router, both 2.4g and 5g. Applied to my computer as well, ethernet and wifi. Already did hard factory reset and upgraded to the latest firmware and still no changes and no results.

I have my logs down below in case if ya'll do some reading, thanks.
 

Attachments

  • syslog (2).txt
    351.2 KB · Views: 25

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Looks like the router is having trouble setting the time w/ the NTP server. If that happens, you can't verify the expiry date of certs to common websites. But you can probably still ping a public IP explicitly.

Code:
ping 8.8.8.8

If you can, then you do have internet access, but the problem is the inability to verify certs and/or domain name resolution (since I don't see dnsmasq being started either).

Beware, sometimes ISPs will NOT accept a new router immediately. Your prior router's WAN MAC address may be "locked" to the ISP (administratively). This is done to prevent unauthorized devices and the allocating of multiple public IPs. That's why it's recommended you *release* the prior DHCP lease before changing routers. Or else clone the prior router's WAN MAC address over to the new router.

P.S. Of course, you could also wait for the old DHCP lease to expire, but who knows how long that might take. You might want to clone NOW, then disconnect overnight so you can use the new router's actual WAN MAC address in the morning.
 
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SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
Looks like the router is having trouble setting the time w/ the NTP server. If that happens, you can't verify the expiry date of certs to common websites. But you can probably still ping a public IP explicitly.

Code:
ping 8.8.8.8

If you can, then you do have internet access, but the problem is the inability to very certs and/or domain name resolution (since I don't see dnsmasq being started either).

Beware, sometimes ISPs will NOT accept a new router immediately. Your prior router's WAN MAC address may be "locked" to the ISP (administratively). This is done to prevent unauthorized devices and the allocating of multiple public IPs. That's why it's recommended you *release* the prior DHCP lease before changing routers. Or else clone the prior router's WAN MAC address over to the new router.

P.S. Of course, you could also wait for the old DHCP lease to expire, but who knows how long that might take. You might want to clone NOW, then disconnect overnight so you can use the new router's actual WAN MAC address in the morning.
Alright, so how do I do that? its exactly 1 AM for me, I could disconnect overnight before I head to the bed since no one uses the internet at this time.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
You can ping from an ssh session, or use Network Tools > Network Analysis (at least it is available w/ Merlin, I assume OEM firmware as well).
 

SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
You can ping from an ssh session, or use Network Tools > Network Analysis (at least it is available w/ Merlin, I assume OEM firmware as well).
Here are the results so far,
Screenshot 2022-07-05 014329.png
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Well that means no internet connectivity at all. So it may be your old router's WAN MAC address is indeed locked to the ISP. Hard to be absolutely sure. But it is a common issue w/ new routers. You shouldn't just yank the old one out and plug the new one in or this sometimes happens.
 

SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
Well that means no internet connectivity at all. So it may be your old router's WAN MAC address is indeed locked to the ISP. Hard to be absolutely sure. But it is a common issue w/ new routers. You shouldn't just yank the old one out and plug the new one in or this sometimes happens.
Okay then, since there's no connectivity at all should I disconnect overnight? I got overly excited and decided to pull the new one in and I guess this happened. Is there any suggestions I can do for the new router?
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Okay then, since there's no connectivity at all should I disconnect overnight? I got overly excited and decided to pull the new one in and I guess this happened. Is there any suggestions I can do for the new router?

What most ppl do is clone the WAN MAC address. Obviously that means reconnecting the old router so you can write it down, then reconnect the new router and clone it. This tricks the ISP into believing the new router is the old router.

But if you don't want to bother, then usually disconnecting (as in removing the cable from the WAN port that's connected to the modem, or power off the router) will eventually cause the lock to be dropped, sometimes after as little as 30 mins, even w/ a DHCP lease that has more time, because the ISP doesn't want his limited pool of public IPs unavailable for extended periods. Then again, it might take several hours. It varies from ISP to ISP.

It might help to disconnect (as in power off) the modem too.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
P.S. I assume your ISP's device is just a modem, NOT a combo router+modem. If it's the latter, is it in bridge mode?

I'm asking because if your new router is daisy-chained (WAN to LAN) behind the ISP's *router* (as opposed to modem, or combo router+modem in bridge mode), then this is NOT an issue of your old router's WAN MAC address being locked to the ISP.

This whole issue of the WAN MAC address is just speculative at the moment.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
If you're going to bed anyway, just power it all down, modem and router, and try again in the morning.
 

SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
What most ppl do is clone the WAN MAC address. Obviously that means reconnecting the old router so you can write it down, then reconnect the new router and clone it. This tricks the ISP into believing the new router is the old router.

But if you don't want to bother, then usually disconnecting (as in removing the cable from the WAN port that's connected to the modem, or power off the router) will eventually cause the lock to be dropped, sometimes after as little as 30 mins, even w/ a DHCP lease that has more time, because the ISP doesn't want his limited pool of public IPs unavailable for extended periods. Then again, it might take several hours. It varies from ISP to ISP.

It might help to disconnect (as in power off) the modem too.
I decided to sleep for the night since my eyes were dropping on me but I powered down both my modem and router, took out the wan port that's connecting the router to the modem, it was turned off at 2 am and turned on again at 9 am.

First thing I did was power on my modem, wait for a 30 seconds, then connect the wan part to my modem and turned on the router, unfortunately the results was still the same, no connectivity at all.

To be straightforward with, how do I exactly clone my wan mac address so my ISP can recognize the router as an old one?
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Find the WAN MAC address of the old router (you'll need to plug it back in, just as before). Since I don't know what you were using before, I can't provide specific guidance as to where it might be (if at all) in the GUI. But it should be able to get it using ssh and the following command.

Code:
ifconfig

You'll see various network interfaces listed on the left, w/ details for each to the right. You need to find the one w/ your public IP, then take note of the hardware address (HWAddr). It may be the eth0 network interface (pretty common), but no guarantee.

Now setup the new router again, and under the WAN > Internet Connection tab, you'll find the MAC Address field, were you provide the hardware MAC from above, then hit the MAC Clone button.
 

SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
Find the WAN MAC address of the old router (you'll need to plug it back in, just as before). Since I don't know what you were using before, I can't provide specific guidance as to where it might be (if at all) in the GUI. But it should be able to get it using ssh and the following command.

Code:
ifconfig

You'll see various network interfaces listed on the left, w/ details for each to the right. You need to find the one w/ your public IP, then take note of the hardware address (HWAddr). It may be the eth0 network interface (pretty common), but no guarantee.

Now setup the new router again, and under the WAN > Internet Connection tab, you'll find the MAC Address field, were you provide the hardware MAC from above, then hit the MAC Clone button.
Took me hours to setup the ssh as I have very few knowledge about this stuff but I got it working, there was no HWAddr in my eth0, but I got what looked like a mac address that started with 70:8b and another 2 with 02:50 and e4:a4, both 3 says ether at the start.

Went to the asus tab you said I pressed the mac clone button and it just replaces the value that I put in there, is that normal or am I doing something wrong? and still no internet connection.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Sorry, I misread how that page works (I don't use the feature myself). I believe you just add the WAN MAC address to the field, they hit Apply at the bottom. In contrast, the MAC Clone button detects YOUR own MAC address while using the GUI, and places *it* in the field, then you hit Apply.

IOW, the MAC Clone feature is specifically for when you're connected directly to the modem w/ some other device (e.g., your PC) rather than the router, it works, and now you want to install your router between the modem and that same PC. Use can use this feature to maintain the same WAN MAC address wrt the modem and ISP. So it's NOT relevant to your current situation.
 
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SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
Sorry, I misread how that page works (I don't use the feature myself). I believe you just add the WAN MAC address to the field, they hit Apply at the bottom. In contrast, the MAC Clone button detects YOUR own MAC address while using the GUI, and places *it* in the field, then you hit Apply.

IOW, the MAC Clone feature is specifically for when you're connected directly to the modem w/ some other device (e.g., your PC) rather than the router, it works, and now you want to install your router between the modem and that same PC. Use can use this feature to maintain the same WAN MAC address wrt the modem and ISP. So it's NOT relevant to your current situation.
Already did as you said, I pressed the mac clone and it automatically pasted the 70:8b that was on my ssh pc, unfortunately there was still no luck and internet connectivity is still no where to be found. For now what do you suggest I should do? should I return this or just patiently wait.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
To repeat, you do NOT want to use the MAC Clone feature. Just add the WAN MAC from your old router and hit Apply at the bottom of the page.

Frankly, at this point, give several hours have passed, any lock the ISP may have created is likely a non issue, and the problem likely lies elsewhere.

I would try resetting the new router to defaults one more time and try again. And post the syslog again.

BTW, what type of connection from the ISP is this? Cable, fiber, PPPoE? And what's the make and model of your modem?

Most routers are designed purposely to make getting connected as easy as possible. I've typically only seen issues when the connection type if other than simple DHCP, such as PPPoE, where perhaps the customer has the wrong sign-on information.
 

SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
To repeat, you do NOT want to use the MAC Clone feature. Just add the WAN MAC from your old router and hit Apply at the bottom of the page.

Frankly, at this point, give several hours have passed, any lock the ISP may have created is likely a non issue, and the problem likely lies elsewhere.

I would try resetting the new router to defaults one more time and try again. And post the syslog again.

BTW, what type of connection from the ISP is this? Cable, fiber, PPPoE? And what's the make and model of your modem?

Most routers are designed purposely to make getting connected as easy as possible. I've typically only seen issues when the connection type if other than simple DHCP, such as PPPoE, where perhaps the customer has the wrong sign-on information.
I've already done what you asked corrected it and so far there was still no results, still the same. my type of connection is fiber and the model is AN5506-04-FA, no idea what the making is but my ISP is PLDT.

Also I've already resetted the router to factory default using the asus mobile app and still the same, here's the syslog.
 

Attachments

  • syslog (4).txt
    395.2 KB · Views: 12

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Well that's a full-blown router+modem (using the term modem here loosely, since this is fiber). NOT just a modem. Did you bridge that device (making it just a modem and allowing your own router to be assigned the public IP), or did you just leave it as-is, a router+modem?

Because if it's the latter, then the situation is even simpler. The ISP's device is managing the internet connection, NOT your router! Your own router is simply double NAT'd behind it. All that's required is that your router and the ISP's router+modem use *different* IP networks (e.g., 192.168.1.x and 192.168.2.x). But if by chance they end up the same, you'll likely lose internet access to your own router.

IOW, if the ISP's router+modem is working as a router, and you were to directly connect a laptop or smartphone to the ISP's router+modem, it would likely work. And so should your own router (again, provided each router's IP networks didn't conflict).

When your router is connected to the ISP's router+modem, what does it report (if anything) for the WAN ip on the home page?
 

SirJeromeIX

Occasional Visitor
Well that's a full-blown router+modem (using the term modem here loosely, since this is fiber). NOT just a modem. Did you bridge that device (making it just a modem and allowing your own router to be assigned the public IP), or did you just leave it as-is, a router+modem?

Because if it's the latter, then the situation is even simpler. The ISP's device is managing the internet connection, NOT your router! Your own router is simply double NAT'd behind it. All that's required is that your router and the ISP's router+modem use *different* IP networks (e.g., 192.168.1.x and 192.168.2.x). But if by chance they end up the same, you'll likely lose internet access to your own router.

IOW, if the ISP's router+modem is working as a router, and you were to directly connect a laptop or smartphone to the ISP's router+modem, it would likely work. And so should your own router (again, provided each router's IP networks didn't conflict).

When your router is connected to the ISP's router+modem, what does it report (if anything) for the WAN ip on the home page?
Nope, I have not bridge the device and I just left it as it is after installing the new one. Since my "modem" is a fiber, is it still necessary to use the rt ax55 considering it has connectivity issues and the only thing I see here that reports is sort of the Wan ipv 6 stated as "down"

Also my new router and modem doesn't have the same IP net work.
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
Is the ISP router handing out IPV4 or IPV6 addresses to devices connected to it's lan port ?
 

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