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Home Wi-fi Set Up, how to improve

Discussion in 'General Wireless Discussion' started by ]cool[, May 24, 2020.

  1. ]cool[

    ]cool[ New Around Here

    Joined:
    May 24, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Hello,

    The last few weeks, I have been buying some smart things for my house, wi-fi switchs, Google Nest, smart plugs, wi-fi leds. That, is creating quite a few problems in my wi-fi.

    I will explain, my CCTV is wireless (I now it's not the most secure, but it was what I could install, PoE was not so popular at the time). I have 5 cameras, A, B, C, D and E.

    I have my main router in the living room, with the internet from my ISP, a TP-Link Archer C1200, here I have the Nest Hub (5 GHz), 3 smart switches, 1 smart plug, camera A and B, and a extender for camera C (even though it's close to the router, it works better this way, but I will ask about this in a few moments), PS4 (first model only has 2.4 GHz) and a Xbox One (5 GHz). From this router, and have a cable for for a switch and another router (a Xioami something...) in my daughter's room, where camera D is connected (only this camera). From this switch, I have another cable to another switch and another TP-Link C1200 in my room, where I have a TV box (5 GHz), camera E, Alexa Dot, 2 smart leds and a smart switch.

    Then I have a powerline to the garage connected to a RE200 working as a AP to a smart switch and a smart plug. The garage has no problem so far.

    So, this is my set up, at least the wireless part, not counting phones and tablets.

    The problems are:

    A - In the living room (C1200), before all IoT devices, I had only Camera A, B and C, my PS4, my Xbox and a extender. Everything worked well, except for Camera C, because it closer to my neighbor and there was interference sometimes. After installing all the smart devices, the 2.4 GHz just stopped working. What I had to do to (kind of) work was, connect camera C to the extender and plug the extender as close as possible, lower the bit rate for the 3 cameras. Also, I bought a SMA cable to connect the camera's antenna closer (about 2 meters) to the extender that is about 2 meters from the router). Even with this, my 2.4 GHz is really slow.

    B - Camera E, like camera C, is on the back of my house, close to my neighbor. They just bought a new TP-Link router and extender (because I can detect them in my phone) and camera. That created a lot of interference, like the other cameras, I had to lower the bitrate to have a steady connection. I also bought a SMA cable to connect the antena closer to the router (sadly, the cable I bought wasn't long enough, I will buy another meter or two).

    My questions are:

    A - I been reading that this router (C1200) has a low limit of devices you can connect to it before the wi-fi just stops working. That seems to be what happened to me. Is this true? Just in case it is, I been looking for a new router, I been looking for Asus AX88U, TP-Link AX6000 or, if these two are overkill, Asus AX58U or TP-Link AX3000. Will one of these routers let me connect all cameras, smart devices, wihtout a problem?

    B - I don't know for sure if the cable will solve the problem (hope so), but is there anything else I can do to help the signal?

    Sorry for such a long post.

    Thank you!

    Regars
     
  2. degrub

    degrub Very Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,094
    A plot plan layout showing where each device is would help us help you. Include walls, etc.
     
  3. Tech Focus

    Tech Focus Regular Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2019
    Messages:
    66
    I think what you are talking or experiencing is high density Wifi, more commonly talked in enterprise product line as well as Wifi 6. The latter unfortunately require clients to be compatible so not a solution for us yet. Cisco Meraki for instance define 30 or more clients in small area as high density.

    With this intro, I don’t know any specific about your setup but you definitely want to ensure you are not hitting device limit (as you suspecting) and if replacing need to ensure the new device is also capable supporting the number including your future expansion. If you feel it’s tight shot, perhaps that may be a reason to look for access point/mesh system to unload clients. For instance you may just add an AP to your existing system. But if area is already adequately covered by existing system, you may need one with ability to change transmission power so it won’t create interference (same for exiting Router unit).
     
  4. dosborne

    dosborne Very Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2019
    Messages:
    606
    Location:
    /dev/null
    Often, extending the antennae causes more issues than it solves. I would avoid this scenario.
     
  5. ]cool[

    ]cool[ New Around Here

    Joined:
    May 24, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    I made it in paint.

    [​IMG]
    This covers the first floor, the RE200 as an AP in the garage doesn't cause problems. In blue (with pencil) it's the SMA cable.

    The first floor is close to 180 m2, I don't have 30 devices. However, I do have a lot of devices on one side of the house (the layout image may help uderstanding this).
    I would like to avoid a mesh system, as it would require me to change all my routers, AP's. My transmission power is at max (looking in the TP-Link GUI).

    Also, both AC1200 and the Xiaomi are using different channels, 1, 6 and 11.

    I already have two cameras with a SMA cable. Even the camera D (the one that works with no problem so far) needed a SMA cable from the start because the steel frame of the house in that spot was causing problems. I had to move the antenna closer to the window.

    A little update, I made a tweak to the settings (channel bandwidth) from Auto to 20 MHz and all 5 cameras at the desire bitrate and working. However, looking at the time stamp, camera C and E had cuts during the night, so it didn't solve completly.

    Regards
     
  6. ]cool[

    ]cool[ New Around Here

    Joined:
    May 24, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Two more follow up questions:

    - Is the AX88U worth it over the AX58U (it costs twice as much)? And, are they worth it over the TP-Link AX6000 and AX3000, respectively? If it helps, I still consider buying a new router;

    - If I buy a new router and have the Wi-Fi with the same name as it is in my C1200, will all cameras, smart devices, Nest Hub, connect immediately? Or do I have to set them up again?

    Regards
     
  7. Tech Focus

    Tech Focus Regular Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2019
    Messages:
    66
    I've done many times as I tend to swap entire home network in several months to a year. As long as you have the identical SSID and Password (not sure if authentication method need to be the same e.g. WPA2 Personal vs. Enterprise) they work as I myself hate to reprogram Nest CO detector. But it is space and case dependent so they must match perfectly.