Moca Adapter Install and Filter Question

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alumiu90

New Around Here
I currently do not subscribe to cable tv and only use cable for my internet service. I remodeled my basement a few years ago and installed all CAT6 cable, but the rest of the house is wired with Coaxial cable only. I have my internet modem located in a storage area and then I use an older Asus router for the router and then feed a switch for the basement. I have an ASUS AC68U in the basement serving as an Access Point for whole house wifi. I want to move the router upstairs and use MOCA to do so.

My question is do I need to install a POE filter if all I plan to do is use a MOCA adapter off of the router or the switch to feed a whole house splitter that then inturn would feed the rest of the upstairs? Basically do I have to be concerned that the MOCA signal will backfeed through the ethernet line into the router or switch and then back to the cable modem (through ethernet line) and out of the house?

Thus setup looks like this. Cable from street into Cable Modem out to Asus Router with Wi-fi turned off out to switch out to basement hardwiring. The Moca Adapter would come off the router or off the switch and then feed coaxial splitter to feed rest of the house.

Other than a possible filter is there a particular MOCA adapter forum members recommend?
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
I currently do not subscribe to cable tv and only use cable for my internet service. I remodeled my basement a few years ago and installed all CAT6 cable, but the rest of the house is wired with Coaxial cable only. I have my internet modem located in a storage area and then I use an older Asus router for the router and then feed a switch for the basement. I have an ASUS AC68U in the basement serving as an Access Point for whole house wifi. I want to move the router upstairs and use MOCA to do so.

My question is do I need to install a POE filter if all I plan to do is use a MOCA adapter off of the router or the switch to feed a whole house splitter that then inturn would feed the rest of the upstairs? Basically do I have to be concerned that the MOCA signal will backfeed through the ethernet line into the router or switch and then back to the cable modem (through ethernet line) and out of the house?

Thus setup looks like this. Cable from street into Cable Modem out to Asus Router with Wi-fi turned off out to switch out to basement hardwiring. The Moca Adapter would come off the router or off the switch and then feed coaxial splitter to feed rest of the house.

Other than a possible filter is there a particular MOCA adapter forum members recommend?

hen feed coaxial splitter to feed rest of the house.

MOCA runs on COAX. It does not run on ethernet cable ! Take a look at the Actiontec or GOCOAX install quick setup guides.

this is the key. - Is the ISP coax feed to the modem connected in any way to the rest of the house internal coax cabling ?

Best if you make a sketch of all of the coax cable paths and devices that are attached ( splitters, modems, cable tv box, DVRs, etc).
We don't care about the ethernet cable side of it at this point. If a splitter is involved in the MOCA coax path, it will need to be certified for MOCA 2. Holland makes many.
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
My question is do I need to install a POE filter if all I plan to do is use a MOCA adapter off of the router or the switch to feed a whole house splitter that then inturn would feed the rest of the upstairs?
Assuming you have a dedicated coax line straight from your provider to your modem (not connected to/through your shared coax plant) -- which would be ideal -- you wouldn't install a "PoE" MoCA filter on that coax line (since there wouldn't be any MoCA signals present); however, you would likely still want to install a MoCA filter (and 75-ohm terminator) on the input of the splitter feeding the rest of the house, for the performance benefit.

e.g.:
isolated MoCA network.png

Other than a possible filter is there a particular MOCA adapter forum members recommend?
The goCoax MoCA 2.5 adapter seems the best value (price/performance-wise). See >here< for some available adapters.

If a splitter is involved in the MOCA coax path, it will need to be certified for MOCA 2. Holland makes many.
Holland's GHS-PRO-M series splitters are recommended. (specs >here<)
 
Last edited:

alumiu90

New Around Here
Thank you for your responses.

I checked last night and found that the cable in from the street feeds into a splitter that then feeds the cable modem.

Since we don't have cable tv anymore I thought that I would use a MOCA adapter hooked up to my router and then feed a separate splitter that would just feed maybe three rooms of the house. This would completely bypass the splitter that is currently being fed from the street. Would I still need a POE filter in this case?

Another option is to unhook the street feed from the current splitter (which is like an 8-10 output splitter) and then just add a double output splitter or just install a coaxial cable extension (incoming feed is two short to reach the current cable modem).

What is the best option to prevent a lot of signal degradation?

Thanks
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
Get a holland 3 way MOCA2 splitter (1 in, 3 out or however many inside cables you want to hook up) and connect only the coax to the rooms that you want and the GOCOAX modem. Ethernet to your router LAN port. You will need 1 GOCOAX modem in each room that you want to have access to the ethernet network.

you can also connect the ISP modem ethernet cable to a GOCOAX modem ethernet port and the interior coax as above, then place your router where you want it, connecting the WAN port to another GOCOAX modem that is one of the three coax branches above.

No MOCA2 POE required.
 
Last edited:

alumiu90

New Around Here
Assuming you have a dedicated coax line straight from your provider to your modem (not connected to/through your shared coax plant) -- which would be ideal -- you wouldn't install a "PoE" MoCA filter on that coax line (since there wouldn't be any MoCA signals present); however, you would likely still want to install a MoCA filter (and 75-ohm terminator) on the input of the splitter feeding the rest of the house, for the performance benefit.

e.g.:
isolated MoCA network.png

krkaufman your diagram is exactly what I am looking to possibly do. Does the POE Filter screw into the input on the splitter or the output? I note on your diagram you don't feed the input from the MOCA adapter through the POE filter. What POE Filter do you recommend?
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
Since we don't have cable tv anymore I thought that I would use a MOCA adapter hooked up to my router and then feed a separate splitter that would just feed maybe three rooms of the house. This would completely bypass the splitter that is currently being fed from the street. Would I still need a POE filter in this case?

Another option is to unhook the street feed from the current splitter (which is like an 8-10 output splitter) and then just add a double output splitter or just install a coaxial cable extension (incoming feed is two short to reach the current cable modem).

What is the best option to prevent a lot of signal degradation?
The "coaxial cable extension" workaround (using a F-81 barrel connector) to effect a direct, isolated feed to the modem would be ideal, and so I'd not change anything from my reply >above<.
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
your diagram is exactly what I am looking to possibly do. Does the POE Filter screw into the input on the splitter or the output? I note on your diagram you don't feed the input from the MOCA adapter through the POE filter. What POE Filter do you recommend?
The "PoE" MoCA filter goes on the input of the splitter, to bounce the MoCA signals back down between outputs, and the "PoE" MoCA filter is capped with a 75-ohm terminator.

As for what MoCA filter to get, a 5-pack wouldn't hurt to have a few spares for the future or to share with friends.
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
The "PoE" MoCA filter goes on the input of the splitter, to bounce the MoCA signals back down between outputs, and the "PoE" MoCA filter is capped with a 75-ohm terminator.
Note that some might suggest an alternative to what I diagrammed, skipping the MoCA filter and its terminator and, instead, connecting the main bridging MoCA adapter to the splitter's input port. The splitter used could either have one less output port, as well, or you could cap one output port for future use by the main bridging MoCA adapter, should you want the flexibility to quickly convert between configurations.

e.g.:

isolated MoCA network - top-fed.png
 

alumiu90

New Around Here
Get a holland 3 way MOCA2 splitter (1 in, 3 out or however many inside cables you want to hook up) and connect only the coax to the rooms that you want and the GOCOAX modem. Ethernet to your router LAN port. You will need 1 GOCOAX modem in each room that you want to have access to the ethernet network.

No MOCA2 POE required.
 

alumiu90

New Around Here
Thanks for everyone's assistance. One last question if I may.

Which MOCA adapter is preferred: goCoax MOCA or Actiontec MOCA 2.5 or Motorola MM1100?

My limitation I assume will be my router or switch which can only transmit at a max of 1GB anyway.
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
the moca 2.5 adapters willl give you closer to full 1 Gbit/ amongst mutiple nodes, particularly over a splitter based star layout. For a point to point, modem-cable-modem, you can get full Gbit/sec. For your arrangement, i would use a MOCA 2.5 setup rather than MOCA2. Your ISP connection is likely the limitation for bandwidth locally, and the internet will be much slower. If you have point to point transfers or streaming locally through your router switch or a stand alone switch, that is where the MOCA 2.5 can help if you have multiple streams going on.

It is unlikely that most residential setups (4-5 MOCA nodes or less) will get close to saturating a MOCA2.0 network, let alone a MOCA 2.5 unless there is very high demand at the same time. Streaming movies and gaming is not likely to do it.
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
See >here< for some available adapters.
$60 per goCoax MoCA 2.5 adapter
$72 per Actiontec ECB6250 MoCA 2.5 adapter (as 2-pack for $143)

$55 per TiVo Bridge Plus (Actiontec ECB6200) bonded MoCA 2.0 adapter ($50 per as 2-pack)
FiOS Network Adapter (Actiontec ECB5240M) at $55 is an attractive end-point w/ 4 GigE ports, if you can get one, for bonded MoCA 2.0 setups.
 

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