Any Asus router for gigabit wifi

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KOA

Regular Contributor
Which Asus is recommended for LAN-Wifi Gigabit speed? I have read and heard about netgear R7800 with factory firmware that can do LAN-to-Wifi 940Mbps. So any Asus to match that with Asus-merlin?
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
Many routers can do it in theory, but it depends on clients radios. Most common client is 2-stream and can't reach Gigabit on Wi-Fi with any router. Or you can try 160MHz wide channels in DFS (if supported by the client) on AX for a chance, close to the router and in a quiet Wi-Fi environment.
 

Morris

Senior Member
The client device is going to be a major factor in achieving a fast transfer as it must have a fast card and sizable antenna. A laptop with Intel's AX-200 or newer can do this.

Morris
 

Morris

Senior Member
Hmm... what is a sizable antenna? 5GHz band (5.2-5.8GHz) dipole antenna is about 1 inch long. Asus router antennas are 1/2 plastic for show.

Try calculating that again!

I get 2.3616 inches for a full wave antenna. Any multiple of this will work so you can also have a 2 wave antenna or a 4 wave antenna. Ever open a laptop? They use 4 wave antenna with one wire going up the side of the monitor and the other along the back of the base. I have not cut open an Asus rubber ducky yet they are probably two wave antenna. It's just a piece of copper wire in a laptop and probably the same in a rubber ducky.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
Try calculating that again!

Here is a better calculator for you, the antenna size, not the wave length.

Ever open a laptop?

Yes, many times. The actual antenna is PCB printed half-wave dipole. The picture below shows typical laptop antenna spare part. Dell, HP, Lenovo all use the same standard antenna type, some exactly the same module from the same supplier, with different manufacturer specific part numbers only.


61e6EDZgWRL._AC_SL1500_.jpg


Asus rubber ducky yet they are probably two wave antenna

No. AC86U, AC68U, AC5300 the spider, N66U, AX58U - all the same half-wave dipole with different amount of plastic around. Some Linksys and TP-Link routers have printed PCB inside the plastic. Find pictures of more fancy XT8 and see what's inside and how long.
 
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mlord

Occasional Visitor
I use an RT-AX86U and usually see 1.7gbs/sec (real measured throughput) when connecting from my -AC notebook and -AX smartphone. That's with a 2.5Gbe LAN behind it.

An RT-AX68U should do a full Gbit/sec for quite a bit less money.
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
close to the router and in a quiet Wi-Fi environment.
This is why Meshing is a big deal - the bigger & "louder" your wifi bubble, the "less loud" the neighbours are to your client devices. (unless there's channel interference, but that's not as common on the 5GHz band)

It's basically playing with S/N ratios - if you've 100dB of signal from 3 meshed radios and your neighbours are at 20dB, your devices hear your 80dB louder transmitters and that guy chatting across the barroom while the band is playing gets drowned out.

but yeah, OP, a couple of the latest AX machines meshed together will do VERY close to what you're looking for or better
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
if you've 100dB of signal from 3 meshed radios and your neighbours are at 20dB

It more like -40dBm vs -80dBm or below. "Meshing" with wireless shared backhaul is cutting the throughput on half. Strong signal won't help much.
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
It more like -40dBm vs -80dBm or below. "Meshing" with wireless shared backhaul is cutting the throughput on half. Strong signal won't help much.
The actual or accurate numbers were irrelevant in my example for conceptual purposes.
 

dlandiss

Very Senior Member
Hmm... what is a sizable antenna?
The size of an antenna is related to, but not limited by, wavelength. Many successful antennas have multiple wavelength dimensions (think Yagi, log-periodic, parabolic reflector, ...).
 

dlandiss

Very Senior Member
I have not cut open an Asus rubber ducky yet they are probably two wave antenna. It's just a piece of copper wire in a laptop and probably the same in a rubber ducky.
The inside of an ASUS external antenna looks a lot like a J-pole. The two elements are not the same length.
 

taffeys

Regular Contributor
The client device is going to be a major factor in achieving a fast transfer as it must have a fast card and sizable antenna. A laptop with Intel's AX-200 or newer can do this.

Morris
The Intel AC-9260 can also. I have replaced Killer 1535 WiFi cards in my Dell XPS netbook and laptop with this card. These connect at 1.7gbs/sec on 5GHz.
 
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Morris

Senior Member
None of those is used in the tech we are talking about.



Link speed yes, only on 160MHz wide channel. Not throughput.

I hit about 1.2 Gb throughput between my laptop with an Intel AX-200 and via my RT-AX86U to my NAS during backup at about 10 feet. Its pretty nice and of cause link speed is faster.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
I hit about 1.2 Gb throughput between my laptop with an Intel AX-200

Yours is AX obviously, 2x2 and you also use 160MHz wide channel. Max link speed is 2402Mbps. My question in post #10 and comment in post #15 were about AC adapters. Only a few can come close to Gigabit throughput.
 

mlord

Occasional Visitor
The question posed was "What notebook can do 1.7Gbps throughput on AC?"

And the answer is any notebook with an Intel AC-9260 adapter can get a link rate of 1.7Gbps, with somewhat slower throughput.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
Intel AC-9260 is the only laptop AC module with 160MHz support on AC. It can connect at 1.7Gbps link speed, but can do about Gigabit throughput. It can't do 1.7Gbps real measured throughput, unless your measurement is wrong. 160MHz is not possible in all Wi-Fi environments.

usually see 1.7gbs/sec (real measured throughput) when connecting from my -AC notebook
 

mlord

Occasional Visitor
Thank you for mis-quoting. The original question was "Any Asus router for gigabit wifi", to which the full reply was ".. usually see 1.7gbs/sec (real measured throughput) when connecting from my -AC notebook and -AX smartphone".

I was mistaken about the notebook -- it only sees about a gigabit real throughput, over a physical layer of 1733mbits/sec. But the smartphone does considerably better than that.

Cheers
 

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