ASUS RT-AC5300

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sm00thpapa

Very Senior Member
What leaked? All companies are starting to go to the AC3100 and AC5300. D-Link should be the first to market though.
 

microchip

Very Senior Member

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev

maylyn

Regular Contributor
Dunno how they came up with that RT-AC5300 name, but AFAIK the correct (current at least) name is RT-AC88U.
Ask DLink ;)

Their 895L/R is phrase in this manner.

Wi-Fi speeds of up to 5330Mpbs (1000Mbps on 2.4GHz + 2165Mbps + 2165Mbps on 5GHz)

So hence 5300 :rolleyes:
 

sm00thpapa

Very Senior Member
1000Mbps on 2.4 GHz band LOL! Good luck getting an adapter that supports that speed.
 

maylyn

Regular Contributor
1000Mbps on 2.4 GHz band LOL! Good luck getting an adapter that supports that speed.
This one you will need to ask Broadcom :p

Of course, the perpetrator of the "TurboQAM" technology that quickly moved the AC Wi-Fi bar from AC1750 to AC1900 for top-shelf routers had to have something to make router makers look at its way-late-to-market 4x4 AC solution. That something appears to be NitroQAM modulation, which could be behind the unusually high top speeds D-Link is claiming for its just-announced DIR-895L/R AC5300 and DIR-885L/R AC3100 ULTRA Wi-Fi Routers.

Updated 1/5/15 - NitroQAM implements 1024-QAM, a 4x increase over the old top 256-QAM 802.11ac modulation rate.
From ~> http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-news/32599-broadcom-joins-the-4x4-ac-fight-club

Of cos, Broadcom will say you will need matching 2.4GHz and 5GHz client chipset to support :rolleyes:
 
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sm00thpapa

Very Senior Member
All these companies making and rushing these routers to market and not one is thinking about compatible adapters.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
All these companies making and rushing these routers to market and not one is thinking about compatible adapters.
If the clients were available first, we'd be complaining about that too if the routers weren't available to take advantage of the client's capabilities. :)

Something has to come first and the routers having these features first is one way to proceed.

Yes, both at the same time would be ideal. But then we'd be saying things like 'brand X' is proprietary or something to that effect, me thinks. :)
 

sm00thpapa

Very Senior Member
If the clients were available first, we'd be complaining about that too if the routers weren't available to take advantage of the client's capabilities. :)

Something has to come first and the routers having these features first is one way to proceed.

Yes, both at the same time would be ideal. But then we'd be saying things like 'brand X' is proprietary or something to that effect, me thinks. :)
Yep true LD. All we can do as consumers is sit back and wait.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture


And that waiting is the hard part since 1981 :)
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
Looks like three new models are under development based on what's in the source code:

RT-AC88
RT-AC3100
RT-AC5200

To get an idea of the second and third one, look at D-Link's announced models that matches with these ratings.
 
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RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
Proprietary technologies rarely gain any worthwile marketshare, as they are manufacturer-specific. If only Broadcom implements that technology, you cut yourself from everyone else that uses Intel, Ralink, etc...

I tend to see them more like marketing gimmicks to inflate numbers than something actually accepted and used by the market. Such extensions should be rolled into the 802.11 standard rather than remain proprietary.
 

joe012594

Regular Contributor
Looks like three new models are under development based on what's in the source code:

RT-AC88
RT-AC3100
RT-AC5200

To get an idea of the second and third one, look at D-Link's announced models that matches with these ratings.
I suspect the RT-AC88 will be the first router they'll release that has 160MHz support for Wave 2 clients along with the AC87's 5GHz 4x4 MIMO setup. So, we'll likely either see it being a Wave 2 AC4100 (if 2.4GHz is still 3x3) or AC4300 (if 2.4GHz is updated to a 4x4 setup).

The RT-AC3100 will be dualband with 4x4 MIMO. 5GHz will have NitroQAM support (theoretical max of 2165Mbps) and 2.4GHz with NitroQAM as well (theoretical max of 1000Mbps).

The RT-AC5200 will differ to the triband AC5300 that D-Link offers, in regards to speeds over 2.4GHz. D-Link's AC5300 utilizes NitroQAM on all 3 radios (2.4GHz + 5GHz-1 + 5GHz-2) while ASUS' RT-AC5200 will only support NitroQAM on both 5GHz radios and TurboQAM + 4x4 MIMO over 2.4GHz. So, 2165Mbps + 2165Mbps + 800Mbps = 5130Mbps total combined throughput.



Edit: BTW, RMerlin, very nice find! Thanks for sharing that info. :)
 
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joe012594

Regular Contributor
I'm interested in the new NitroQAM modulation Broadcomm is introducing with the BCM4366. It apparently boosts 802.11ac speeds up to 541.25Mbps per spacial stream, which is a 25% increase in bandwidth capabilities when compared to TurboQAM's peak speeds of 433Mbps. Also, really like that 2.4GHz still get's some update love too. Unfortunately, not very many STAs on the market yet support even TurboQAM for 200Mbps per spacial stream, which is a bit disappointing. Another interesting fact is that the BCM4366 appears to support 160+160MHz of aggregated spectrum and even 8x8 MU-MIMO. Doubt these capabilities will actually be live in the RT-AC5200. Still interesting though. In any case, this new router will definitely be on my list of things to get, pronto. Here's how average STAs will benefit from it.

Average 802.11ac STAs

2.4GHz 40+40MHz: 150Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 300Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 450Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 600Mbps (4x4 MIMO)
5GHz 40+40MHz: 200Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 400Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 600Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 800Mbps (4x4 MIMO)
5GHz 80+80MHz: 433Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 866Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 1299Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 1732Mbps (4x4 MIMO)

802.11ac STAs w/ 2.4GHz TurboQAM

2.4GHz 40+40MHz: 200Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 400Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 600Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 800Mbps (4x4 MIMO)
5GHz 40+40MHz: 200Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 400Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 600Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 800Mbps (4x4 MIMO)
5GHz 80+80MHz: 433Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 866Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 1299Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 1732Mbps (4x4 MIMO)

802.11ac STAs w/ NitroQAM


2.4GHz 40+40MHz: 250Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 500Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 750Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 1000Mbps (4x4 MIMO)
5GHz 40+40MHz: 250Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 500Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 750Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 1000Mbps (4x4 MIMO)
5GHz 80+80MHz: 541.25Mbps (1x1 SISO) | 1082.5Mbps (2x2 MIMO) | 1623.75Mbps (3x3 MIMO) | 2165Mbps (4x4 MIMO)



NOTE: NitroQAM speeds weren't included in the 2.4GHz band in light of RMerlin's findings. ASUS is working on model, RT-AC5200, which excludes NitroQAM modulation from 2.4GHz. However, 2.4GHz still includes TurboQAM modulation and 4x4 MIMO for a grand total of 5130Mbps throughput when both 5GHz bands are added into the equation, which ASUS will round out to 5200Mbps.
 
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sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
Proprietary technologies rarely gain any worthwile marketshare, as they are manufacturer-specific. If only Broadcom implements that technology, you cut yourself from everyone else that uses Intel, Ralink, etc...

I tend to see them more like marketing gimmicks to inflate numbers than something actually accepted and used by the market. Such extensions should be rolled into the 802.11 standard rather than remain proprietary.
I agree with RMerlin - things have gotten pretty silly with proprietary extensions... QAM1024 is just one of them, X-Stream is another...

Pretty soon, you'll be able to buy an AC-gazillion class router... too bad that no-one can actually see that level of performance.

sfx
 

sm00thpapa

Very Senior Member
Exciting times ahead for us router enthusiasts. To bad there is no info on client chips.
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
Exciting times ahead for us router enthusiasts. To bad there is no info on client chips.
I don't see anything exciting there, quite frankly. We don't even have clients yet capable of running at the full speed of last year's platform. Bigger numbers on the wifi rates mean nothing so long as laptops still ship with 150 Mbps single band NICs, tablets ships with 2x2 clients. Those numbers are nothing but marketing material at this time.

"Exciting" for me is when I see Asus adding the Trend Micro DPI engine, or when Securifi releases a router that sports home automation support.
 

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