Moca Adapter Installation for Ethernet Connection

gkdefined

New Around Here
Hello, I am completely new to this but basically I am having trouble installing my newly purchase GoCoax moca adapters. I have drew a diagram to explain my coaxil wiring situation.

All 3 bedrooms have an individual wire going down into the basement, and I want to connect them to receive internet through coaxil cable


Questions I have

1.In total I would require 4 Moca adapters. 1 for each bedroom, and one for the modem connection right?
Do I need a moca adapter to the router?

2. How would I install the splitter? Would this one be sufficient?
121613678_368975500917045_4401652205350340091_n.jpg


121700770_375939376926041_969121643284094732_n.jpg


Thank you very much
 

Waltski

Occasional Visitor
You will need a MoCA-rated splitter instead of the one pictured in your query. Unless you actually need 4 ports, a 3-way MoCA splitter is preferred, such as this one
1602725006298.png
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
#2) No. you need a bidirectional splitter certified for moca 2. This will give you the frequency range of 5 to 1675 MHz. Holland makes some. There are others as well.

is your isp modem doccis 3.0 or 3.1 ?
That will affect the bandwidth of the splitter you need in addition to what moca2 requires. If doccis 3.1, then just use all moca2 rated splitters.

#1) isp coax —- moca poe blocking filter —- 6 port moca2 rated splitter ( 1 in, 5 out ports) ——out: # 1 isp modem, #2 gocoax modem, #3-5 cable to each bedroom. Connect your router wan port to the isp modem lan port. Connect gocoax lan port to your router lan port.

if there is too much signal loss to the isp modem, use a 2 way splitter first, with the outlets going to the isp modem and then a 5 port moca2 (4 way) splitter to the gocoax modem and the 3 rooms. you can place the moca poe filter either as first described or between the 2way and the 4way splitters.
Place it between the splitters to isolate your moca network from the isp network.

the second configuration gives you the most flexibility for future changes since it splits the isp modem away from the moca2 network. I would choose the second configuration.

there are two ways to set up your moca network : a star with individual point to point moca runs ( highest possible bandwidth 1 GHz bidirectional on each run or a series ( series through the splitter ) that each node shares the total bandwidth with all other nodes. The first option requires 3 modem pairs + 1 modem + a 5 port unmanaged gigabit switch. The second option requires 1 modem at each room + 1 at the router. If your use case is just ordinary home use, the second option should be adequate.

do note that moca modems introduce a few msec of lag to a connection. Some lag sensitive cases for internet or local usage might notice. You will have to test to see. I have one person on my home network that games. He has not complained yet. We have gig fiber, so that may be swamping the result to not significant.
 
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gkdefined

New Around Here
#2) No. you need a bidirectional splitter certified for moca 2. This will give you the frequency range of 5 to 1675 MHz. Holland makes some. There are others as well.

is your isp modem doccis 3.0 or 3.1 ?
That will affect the bandwidth of the splitter you need in addition to what moca2 requires. If doccis 3.1, then just use all moca2 rated splitters.

#1) isp coax —- moca poe blocking filter —- 6 port moca2 rated splitter ( 1 in, 5 out ports) ——out: # 1 isp modem, #2 gocoax modem, #3-5 cable to each bedroom. Connect your router wan port to the isp modem lan port. Connect gocoax lan port to your router lan port.

if there is too much signal loss to the isp modem, use a 2 way splitter first, with the outlets going to the isp modem and then a 5 port moca2 (4 way) splitter to the gocoax modem and the 3 rooms. you can place the moca poe filter either as first described or between the 2way and the 4way splitters.
Place it between the splitters to isolate your moca network from the isp network.

the second configuration gives you the most flexibility for future changes since it splits the isp modem away from the moca2 network. I would choose the second configuration.

there are two ways to set up your moca network : a star with individual point to point moca runs ( highest possible bandwidth 1 GHz bidirectional on each run or a series ( series through the splitter ) that each node shares the total bandwidth with all other nodes. The first option requires 3 modem pairs + 1 modem + a 5 port unmanaged gigabit switch. The second option requires 1 modem at each room + 1 at the router. If your use case is just ordinary home use, the second option should be adequate.

do note that moca modems introduce a few msec of lag to a connection. Some lag sensitive cases for internet or local usage might notice. You will have to test to see. I have one person on my home network that games. He has not complained yet. We have gig fiber, so that may be swamping the result to not significant.
#2, How would I install the splitter? Would I need at least 2 in order to split to all 3 bedrooms?
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
yes, two splitters
use this type -
Holland GHS-PRO-M series)

here is how i would make the connection on coax
ISP--->2way splitter IN --->OUT Leg#1 to ISP modem, OUT leg#2 to POE MOCA filter ---->4way MOCA2 splitter IN --->OUT leg#1 to gocoax modem in, Leg #2 to room 1, Leg #3 to room 2, Leg #4 to room3.
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
1.In total I would require 4 Moca adapters. 1 for each bedroom, and one for the modem connection right?
If a typical setup, yes, assuming there is no existing Ethernet connectivity in any of the remote rooms.

Do I need a moca adapter to the router?
If the router is a separate device, you should include the router in your diagram, as well as any available Ethernet connectivity to the router's LAN, because... the main/central bridging MoCA adapter (aka MoCA access point) must be connected to your shared coax plant *and* via Ethernet to a LAN port on your router (either directly or via a network switch).
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
here is how i would make the connection on coax
ISP--->2way splitter IN --->OUT Leg#1 to ISP modem, OUT leg#2 to POE MOCA filter ---->4way MOCA2 splitter IN --->OUT leg#1 to gocoax modem in, Leg #2 to room 1, Leg #3 to room 2, Leg #4 to room3.
One reason the above recommended configuration is preferable, if possible, beyond the improved signal strength delivered to the cable modem, is that it isolates your cable modem from the MoCA signals, which becomes more pressing as providers roll-out DOCSIS 3.1 (or customers buy DOCSIS 3.1 hardware), owing to a frequency overlap between the DOCSIS 3.1 and MoCA specs.

See: MoCA vs. DOCSIS 3.1: Whose Spectrum Is It?
 

gkdefined

New Around Here
So I am still having troubles, whenever I add the splitter that is moca compatible my internet connection breaks

Router/modem should the coaxil cable be connected to the moca adapter, and then the splitter? Where must the splitter go?
 

gkdefined

New Around Here
the modem coaxil should go to moca adapter TV and the moca adapter through filter? Sorry i am not incredibly teksavy this is new to me
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
Addl alternatives for how to wire your central components, depending on coax runs available and whether your modem needs protection from MoCA signals. The preferable configuration (as described above by @degrub) would be having separate coax runs for the modem and main bridging MoCA adapter, to eliminate any concerns of conflict between MoCA and the modem or DOCSIS 3.1.


main alt - isolated modem.pngmain alt - pass-through.pngmain alt - splitter.pngmain alt - splitter w protective MoCA filter.png
 
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krkaufman

Senior Member
Thank you, so I would need a total of 3 moca splitters?
It depends on what configuration you select to implement. (See the followup post with alternatives, including the preferred setup described earlier.)

What is the POE Moca Filter connected from? My coaxil cable line upstairs go directly downstairs and they are all 3 separate cables.
As pictured ... again depending on the configuration chosen. (Noting that, though not labeled, the coax line leading off the left edge of the example diagrams is intended as the incoming coax line from the ISP.)

The first thing to understand is the function of the "PoE" MoCA filter ... in that it blocks/reflects MoCA signals, and is used at the cable signal's point-of-entry (PoE) to keep your MoCA signals from traveling out of your residence and onto the cable provider's coax plant (and potentially over to a neighbor's home). Though, as implemented in the preferred setup, the "PoE" MoCA filter may be relocated from the literal PoE to optimize the MoCA network, keeping the MoCA coax plant as small as necessary.
 

gkdefined

New Around Here
It depends on what configuration you select to implement. (See the followup post with alternatives, including the preferred setup described earlier.)


As pictured ... again depending on the configuration chosen. (Noting that, though not labeled, the coax line leading off the left edge of the example diagrams is intended as the incoming coax line from the ISP.)

The first thing to understand is the function of the "PoE" MoCA filter ... in that it blocks/reflects MoCA signals, and is used at the cable signal's point-of-entry (PoE) to keep your MoCA signals from traveling out of your residence and onto the cable provider's coax plant (and potentially over to a neighbor's home). Though, as implemented in the preferred setup, the "PoE" MoCA filter may be relocated from the literal PoE to optimize the MoCA network, keeping the MoCA coax plant as small as necessary.
You guys are the fracking best, life savers. I have it working now, thank you so much!
 

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